Please note: You only need to register / login if you wish to make representations.

VALP Proposed Submission

Having trouble using the system? Visit our help page or contact us directly.

Previous Chapter || Next Chapter

4 Strategic Delivery

Aylesbury – Delivery of a Garden Town

View Comments (1) 4.1 In January 2017 Aylesbury was given "Garden Town" status. This announcement came after submission of a successful expression of interest by AVDC and its partner organisations[12] in October 2016. The expression of interest set out a bid for funding to support the delivery of new communities at Aylesbury and ensure that growth comes forward in the best possible way: ensuring high quality and design are embedded and to enable a cohesive and comprehensive approach to planning for growth. Work is now underway to create a masterplan for Aylesbury which will enable a overarching plan for future growth of the town.

View Comments (3) 4.2 Aylesbury is identified as  playing a substantial and critical role in delivering growth for the district and the rest of Buckinghamshire.  Identified as a new 'Garden Town' Aylesbury will be a focus for:

  • new market and affordable housing
  • new investment in economic activity and regeneration
  • new retail and employment development
  • delivering Aylesbury Transport Strategy prioritising investment in multi-modal transport infrastructure and transport hub, and
  • new infrastructure, including health, education and community infrastructure, open space and recreation, and emergency and public services.

View Comments (3) 4.3 The identification of Aylesbury as a Garden Town recognises Aylesbury's role as the county town for Buckinghamshire and its central location in the 'brain belt' between Oxford and Cambridge. The rural area that surrounds Aylesbury provides an exemplar setting for the town located on the edge of the Chiltern Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Grand Union Canal.

Supplementary planning documents

View Comments (1) 4.4 Alongside the policy within VALP a series of accompanying  supplementary planning documents (SPDs)  are being developed to support delivery of the Garden Town. These SPDs will focus on:

  • strategic infrastructure delivery of the Garden Town – this will set out all the key strategic physical and social infrastructure required to deliver a Garden Town setting out how it is funded, when it will be delivered and how
  • design guidance for the Garden Town – this will further define the character of the Garden Town and provide design guidance for key components such as transport and movement routes, parks and green space and built development, and focus on delivery and implementation of this
  • Site-specific SPDs, as required, for the garden communities to set out a clear and detailed framework for place-making and delivery of each site.

View Comments (1) 4.5 An overarching masterplan and work to look at the future of Aylesbury will seek to address some of these challenges and look beyond the Plan period to 2050.

Challenges and Opportunities for Aylesbury Garden Town

Sustainable development

Aylesbury Garden Town housing

View Comments (1) 4.6 Aylesbury's housing requirements will be delivered through a combination of existing allocations and commitments, other 'deliverable' sites and VALP allocations, which together will meet the overall requirements for Aylesbury.  The VALP allocations consist of a combination of allocations made on previously-developed land and on greenfield sites on the edge of Aylesbury.

View Comments (1) 4.7 Taking forward past completions since 2013 (2,861 dwellings)[13] and projected supply from existing allocated sites and other deliverable sites (5,727 dwellings), this leaves 7,810 dwellings to be allocated at Aylesbury in the VALP. 

View Comments (1) 4.8 Where possible the Council seeks to ensure development of previously-developed sites. This is the case at Aylesbury and a number of dwellings are accommodated in the existing Aylesbury urban area (including the town centre) on previously developed land.  These developments will improve the quality of the urban environment through their positive redevelopment and regeneration. The remainder of Aylesbury's housing development is at linked and integrated sustainable urban extensions on greenfield sites around the town (see the Aylesbury Garden Town maps) creating distinctive garden communities. These developments will be linked to the existing Aylesbury urban area but will also  function as distinctive communities.

View Comments (1) 4.9 An important element of  new housing development is the provision of affordable housing to meet the identified needs and to provide a mix of house types and sizes. These issues are covered in more detail in policies in the Housing section. The mix of housing within the Garden Town will respond to local needs in relation to mix, size and type, and ensure the development of inclusive and varied communities, planning for the elderly, lifetime homes, self and custom build.

Aylesbury Garden Town employment 

View Comments (2) 4.10 Critical to the development of a sustainable Garden Town is accompanying growth in homes and jobs. Three Aylesbury Vale Enterprise Zones (AVEZ) are designated at Aylesbury, Westcott and Silverstone. The designation of an enterprise zone based around the existing Arla complex at Aylesbury takes advantage of existing infrastructure and supports the growth of a sustainable employment location and is strategically placed at Aylesbury, on the A41 dual carriageway leading directly to the M25 near Watford. Employment allocations will also be made within the garden communities alongside new housing developments to complement housing growth and allow creation of sustainable urban extensions where people have the opportunity to both live and work without the need to travel long distances.

View Comments (1) 4.11 The overarching strategy is to stimulate the development of a number of emergent growing sectors – high performance technologies and motorsports focused at Silverstone EZ, space propulsion focused at Westcott EZ and environmental technologies and food and drink manufacturing and human health focused at Arla/Woodlands EZ.

View Comments (1) 4.12 The key employment challenges for Aylesbury Garden Town are to:

  • encourage economic growth to meet the forecast need for jobs;
  • deliver employment in the most sustainable locations to support and complement housing growth and produce mixed use developments which reduce the need to travel;
  • provide strategic sites as well as encourage existing companies to remain and grow within the area recognising the connectivity of businesses in Aylesbury to adjacent areas, the rest of the UK and internationally;
  • provide a diverse and flexible range of employment sites and premises for new and existing businesses, by maintaining a flexible supply of employment land and premises in Aylesbury;
  • retain and improve high value employment sites by making the best use of existing stock and encouraging its refurbishment and renovation where necessary particularly where applications come forward that will maintain existing number of jobs on sites;
  • encourage skills growth innovation with the provision of business-led skills to help specifically grow the knowledge economy and manufacturing;
  • retain highly qualified graduates and reduce the current levels of outward commuting;
  • invest in strategic transport and broadband infrastructure to encourage more self employment in the knowledge-based sectors, micro businesses and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) that make up to 90% of the economic activity;
  • supporting business-to-business and educational collaboration between growing businesses to encourage further growth and expansion; and
  • ensure there is support and nurturing activities for new enterprises to encourage the growth of the economy.

Aylesbury Garden Town - town centre

View Comments (2) 4.13 The growth at Aylesbury, and across the rest of the district, will need to be accompanied by and supported by a vibrant town centre. The Aylesbury Town Centre Plan contains a vision for the town:

  • to be a high profile, sub-regional centre for entertainment and the arts, which has added a distinctive edge to its market town heritage
  • to be a distinctive, 'best in class', modern market town, which is attractive, safe, sustainable and accessible, and
  • to provide a quality, day and evening environment in terms of leisure, retail and food and drink, which attracts and brings together people of all ages and communities from within its enviable catchment.

View Comments (25) 4.14 Policy D7 (Aylesbury town centre) supports the delivery of development and revival/growth of Aylesbury town centre and sets out a strategy for improving and contributing to delivery of the visons and aims set out in the policy. 

Aylesbury Garden Town movement

Aylesbury transport strategy

View Comments (2) 4.15 To continue to grow the town successfully, key transport issues need addressing including tackling congestion, managing demand, enhancing access, increasing active travel and enhancing public transport in Aylesbury. The district and county councils have developed a transport strategy for the Garden Town, the principles of which are seen as part of a balanced and integrated package of measures. Transport schemes that will be integral to supporting the growth of Aylesbury Vale will be secured under Policy T2 Protected Transport Schemes.

View Comments (34) 4.16 The Aylesbury Transport Strategy supports Aylesbury Garden Town by assessing the existing and future transportation network conditions based on future housing and employment growth and demographic change and identifying transport improvements across various modes which aim to deliver the six overarching strategic objectives to guide the growth:

  • Improve transport access and movement to the town centre
  • Minimise the impact of future growth on traffic levels, congestion and air quality
  • Make it easier and more accessible through provision of walking and cycling connections and the use of public transport
  • Improve journey time reliability
  • Improve accessibility to other urban centres and new growth areas, and
  • Reduce the risk of death or injury on the transport network

View Comments (32) 4.17 The Aylesbury Transport Strategy builds on previous and currently planned improvements to transport infrastructure. The initial work has identified a list of potential transport interventions for Aylesbury which will enable growth, influence travel behaviour and meet the strategic objectives identified above. These will be based on:

  • completing a series of outer link roads that will take traffic away from the town centre and allow public transport priority improvements to take place on the main radial roads closer to the town centre, improving public transport journey time reliability
  • implementing an overarching strategy to connect new developments, with each other, to key destinations and to the town centre by active travel and public transport
  • considering new ways to redesign roads within central area of Aylesbury to ensure access for all
  • undertaking a parking study to understand current supply and demand in order to reassess parking provisions and controls
  • completing gaps in the cycling/walking network, particularly connections within the Aylesbury Gemstone cycle network
  • improving pedestrian crossing options where safety is an issue or where major roads act as a barrier to pedestrian movements, including the inner relief road around the town centre, and
  • ensuring a strategic approach is in place for providing sustainable transport access to all new development and ensuring good transport links are in place to all three rail stations around the town centre.

Aylesbury Garden Town community

Community facilities, infrastructure and community cohesion

View Comments (4) 4.18 Providing appropriate new infrastructure to support housing and employment development at Aylesbury is essential to the creation of sustainable garden communities. With growth comes an increased demand for additional community facilities and infrastructure, but it also brings about a need to integrate new developments into existing communities and vice versa. Infrastructure includes hard infrastructure such as roads and cycle routes, community infrastructure such as schools, higher education, healthcare facilities, and green infrastructure such as green spaces and wildlife corridors.  Policies D2 and S4 support infrastructure delivery. Design and development of new communities and infrastructure should maximise opportunities for community cohesion.

Aylesbury Garden Town green infrastructure

View Comments (2) 4.19 In creating a Garden Town, the Plan must include green spaces and natural environments for local communities. Strategic green infrastructure assets should be identified, retained and enhanced, including improving connectivity through the development of green corridors. Local open spaces should be protected and where possible connected to strategic green infrastructure networks. Aylesbury Garden Town has linkages which should be enhanced to connect the surrounding countryside to the Chilterns and surrounding rural areas. 

View Comments (2) 4.20 The Buckinghamshire Green Infrastructure Delivery Plan (August 2013) was produced to build upon the Buckinghamshire Green Infrastructure Strategy (2009) and the Aylesbury Vale Green Infrastructure Strategy (2011). It identified a long list of green infrastructure (GI) projects, a number of which were focused around Aylesbury. From this list a series of priority areas were selected. One of these combined a number of the above projects and focuses on Aylesbury. This proposal area also forms the greater part of the county green infrastructure priority action area 2, Aylesbury environs. It includes a number of countryside access gateways identified in the 2009 County GI Strategy, notably Quarrendon Leas and, at greater distance, the Waddesdon Estate (National Trust), Tring Reservoirs Complex/College Lake and Wendover Woods:

Aylesbury Linear Park (includes a number of flagship GI projects: Aylesbury Linear Park east and west and Quarrendon Leas to the west and Grand Union Triangle, Wendover Woods and Regional Wetland Park to the east)

Part of the 'Area Around Aylesbury' GI Priority Action Area 2 in the County GI Strategy. Selected due to large-scale planned and part-implemented growth (developer led GI through development at Berryfields and Aylesbury East) and the fact that the area around Aylesbury is already the focus for many positive strategic GI proposals – Linear Park, Quarrendon Leas, Regional Wetland Park, Grand Union Triangle, plus Vale Park and thematic projects such as 'Trees Please' in the Aylesbury Vale GI Strategy. A number of these address the strategic accessible natural greenspace standard (ANGSt) deficits identified in the county GI Strategy (e.g. Quarrendon Lees, Wendover Woods). Deficit continues to be experienced at the district accessible natural greenspace (ANG) level and this should be a focus for future urban GI planning. The area is linked into key GI area corridors via the River Thame, plus Grand Union Canal corridors and foothills/scarps of the Chilterns to the east, which include strategic ANG resources which are the focus of strategic projects e.g. Wendover Woods. BOAs at Thame Valley and Wendover Woods.

View Comments (1) 4.21 The green infrastructure proposal map for this, shown below, sets out the proposal area and some detail about the project. More information can be found in the green infrastructure proposals schedule in the delivery plan. Policy I1 supports the delivery of green infrastructure.

\\aylesbury.gov.uk\ProfileRoot\Userdata\wojniako\My
          Documents\5326-Bucks-GI-Delivery-Plan-FINAL-ISSUE_2013_08_07_low_res
          54.jpg

View Comments (1) Aylesbury Linear Park Green Infrastructure Proposals Map

Allocating at Aylesbury

View Comments (3) 4.22 In deciding where Aylesbury should grow, as much development as possible is to be located on previously-developed land in the town centre and existing urban area, but due to the scale of the growth, significant greenfield development will also be necessary. 

View Comments (2) 4.23 A Cumulative Impact Assessment[14] has been undertaken to assess the impacts of the future growth at Aylesbury as a whole and to ensure that future delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town is sustainable and well integrated into the town's existing urban edge and consideration of the impact of development, taking into account the following factors:

  • transport
  • flood risk
  • access to employment
  • water supply
  • specific infrastructure requirements
  • sewerage
  • integration with Aylesbury
  • landscape
  • strategic green infrastructure
  • agricultural land classification
  • contaminated land
  • relationship with other settlements
  • ecology
  • accessibility
  • historic environment
  • deliverability
  • overall environment
  • utilities

Aylesbury Garden Town Vision

View Comments (1) 4.24 The vision for Aylesbury Garden Town builds on the principles of sustainable development established in the previous Local Plan (carried forward in VALP and set out in policy S1) with the delivery of high quality new homes, new jobs, new transport improvements, and community facilities. New housing allocations (combined with existing committed and sites already built) will ensure that 16,398 new dwellings will be provided in Aylesbury between 2013 and 2033.  Jobs will be provided to support the delivery of homes, driven by the designated enterprise zone at Aylesbury (Woodlands/Arla). The transport strategy for Aylesbury Garden Town will deliver an overarching strategy to connect new developments, improve accessibility to the town centre, and improve public and sustainable transport for both existing and new residents and businesses. This will build on already planned improvements to transport infrastructure. In addition, there will be new shops in a reinvigorated town centre, alongside health, education, leisure and other community facilities, and other infrastructure associated with the new development.

View Comments (1) 4.25 The strategy for Aylesbury is to deliver a new Garden Town which creates a sustainable and economically viable place. The principles for development can be split into four categories: sustainable development, movement, community, and green infrastructure.

View Comments (1) 4.26 The vision for Aylesbury Garden Town is that:  

View Comments (1) 4.27 By 2033, it will have grown and be an inclusive, innovative and forward-looking Garden Town that meets the needs and aspirations of existing and new residents, businesses and visitors.  Aylesbury Garden Town will be a key hub, a place to visit, with public transport and interchange offering a diverse choice of travel modes, and a recognised centre for investment and growth providing new jobs and opportunities for all. Aylesbury Garden Town will have:

  • a thriving and revitalised town centre
  • quality homes,  facilities, infrastructure and job opportunities
  • distinctive garden communities each with their own identity
  • high quality, connected green space and good connections to its rural surroundings
  • walking cycling and sustainable transport links.

View Comments (4) 4.28 Between now and 2033:

  • The town will have grown sustainably, by reusing previously developed sites and by developing well-designed, connected, safe and integrated urban extensions, creating an integrated network of thriving, vibrant garden communities.  This growth will have a strong focus on sustainability and community cohesion, and each distinctive community will include new homes (including affordable homes), jobs, shops, leisure/recreational facilities and community, health and social care facilities.  This will provide good quality housing for people within Aylesbury Vale as well as business premises and facilities, enabling residents and visitors to find work, shop and spend their leisure time in the area. 
  • Taking forward the town centre masterplan, Aylesbury town centre will have an enhanced environment, with shops, leisure facilities, open space, homes and services, built and designed to high standards, bringing a renewal to the town enhancing the attraction of the historic core, and creating well-designed developments that are sensitive to the district's local character.  The centre will be vibrant and energetic with plenty for all to do and enjoy throughout the day and into the night, serving both the urban and rural populations.
  • Aylesbury's role as the county town will continue and be improved so that local government, legal and other essential services are recognised for their excellence and personal focus.
  • The town will have an accessible, sustainable and well-managed green infrastructure network, including a new linear park adjoining the HS2 line on the western edge of the town, improved linkages from the town and new communities to the Chilterns and surrounding countryside, contributing to the biodiversity of the area and supporting a range of recreational activities.   
  • The growth will be planned in a way which minimises the need to travel by private car, with more and more people choosing to walk, cycle or use public transport.  Traffic growth will be managed to control congestion. 
  • The residents of new garden communities at Aylesbury will feel a strong sense of their own community identity as well as feeling an integral part of a successfully growing, vibrant town.
  • The benefits of growth will have been maximised, bringing about significant infrastructure improvements including:
    • increased public transport,  with successful extension of the Aylesbury Rainbow bus routes
    • increased walking and cycling facilities, and extension of the Aylesbury Gemstone cycleways
    • road improvements linking new developments to the town, and creating a series of links road around the town
    • increased flood management and alleviation  for the town, and
    • enhancements to the regional rail infrastructure linking us to neighbouring growth areas including East West Rail which will open up rail access to the north, east and west for the first time since 1965.
  • As a result, new links will help to ensure that local businesses in Aylesbury and the surrounding rural areas continue to thrive and grow.
  • Aylesbury's  most valued assets such as the historic old town, conservation areas, the river Thame, the Grand Union Canal and Hartwell House historic park and garden will be protected and enhanced, allowing communities to celebrate their history, their identity and their diversity.
  • The impacts of climate change will have been minimised, especially by building exemplar new developments and increasingly sustainable travel choices.  As a result, local carbon emissions  will be low relative to UK averages.
  • Visitors will use Aylesbury more and more as a base to explore local attractions such as Waddesdon Manor, Hartwell House, Wendover Woods, the Chilterns AONB and other tranquil and attractive areas. The town will be a centre for entertainment and the arts, with a successful theatre, museums and festivals which make Aylesbury an attractive place to visit.
  • Aylesbury's role and reputation as a centre for education diversity and excellence will be maintained and strengthened. People in Aylesbury will have access to excellent education opportunities, both academically and vocationally.
  • The Paralympic heritage of the town will be celebrated and embedded into the vision and design principles for Aylesbury Garden Town ensuring the town is accessible to all.
  • People will live longer, healthier lives, and the contribution made by older people to the community will be valued and appropriate services will be available to meet their changing needs.  As a result of growth and regeneration, the difference in available opportunities between the most affluent and less well-off communities will be narrowed.

View Comments (1) 4.29 All of these will have combined to help make Aylesbury Garden Town a very attractive, healthy and cohesive place to live and work, offering its residents, visitors and employees the very best quality of life.

View Comments (63) D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town

Aylesbury Garden Town is the focus for the majority of the district's growth.  It should develop in accordance with the vision for Aylesbury Garden Town set out above and deliver key infrastructure requirements (in accordance with Policy S5).

Aylesbury will deliver 16,398 new homes. Taking account of commitments and completions, 7,810 homes are allocated at Aylesbury in the Plan.  The Policies Map allocates the following major sites for development:

  • South Aylesbury (D-AGT1)
  • South west Aylesbury (D-AGT2)
  • Aylesbury north of A41 (D-AGT3)
  • Aylesbury south of A41 (D-AGT4)
  • Berryfields, Aylesbury (D-AGT5)
  • Kingsbrook, Aylesbury (D-AGT6)

The following smaller sites are also allocated:

  • Ardenham Lane Aylesbury (D-AYL032)
  • Land at Thame Road/Leach Road, Aylesbury (D-AYL073)
  • Post Office Sorting Office Cambridge Street (D-AYL052)
  • Land at the Junction of Buckingham Street & New Street (D-AYL059)
  • Oaklands Hostel Aylesbury (D-AYL077)
  • Hampden House (D-AYL063)
  • Land North of Manor Hospital (D-AYL068)
  • Rabans Lane (D-AYL115)

Provision will be made for employment within the enterprise zones and at identified employment sites across the town in line with Policy E1 and allocations AGT3, AGT4, AGT5 and AGT6.

All development in Aylesbury should make a significant contribution to meeting the Aylesbury Transport Strategy.

To complement housing and employment provision, developments in the town centre will contribute to consolidating and enhancing its role as set out in policy D7.

The design and delivery of development within Aylesbury Garden Town should adhere to the following principles:

  1. To create distinctive, sustainable, high quality, successful new communities with the highest quality, planning, design and management of the built and public realm. This will ensure that new garden communities and development within the Garden Town is distinctive, enhancing local assets and establishing environments that promote health, happiness and well-being. Detailed design guidance will be set out within the overarching Aylesbury Garden Town Design Guidance SPD and individual site-specific supplementary planning documents (SPDs)
  2. Ensuring the right infrastructure is provided at the right time, ahead of or in tandem with the development that it supports, to address the impacts of new garden communities and to meet the needs of residents (in accordance with Policy S5 and the Infrastructure Delivery Plan). The Aylesbury Garden Town Strategic Infrastructure Delivery SPD will set out in detail when infrastructure is required and how it will be delivered and funded
  3. Community and stakeholder engagement is embedded within the design and delivery of the Garden Town from the outset. The stakeholder and engagement strategy for the Garden Town will need to be taken into account and long-term community engagement planned for
  4. Development will be delivered to provide a truly balanced and inclusive community and meet the needs of local people, including the mix of dwellings sizes, tenures and types including provision for custom and self build and for an ageing population (in line with policies H5, H6 and H7); the Garden Town will also deliver housing for those most in need through delivery of a minimum of 25% affordable housing (in line with policy H1)
  5. Providing and promoting opportunities for employment for new and existing residents, both within and alongside new garden communities, to support and enhance the overall economic viability of Aylesbury Garden Town (inline with policies E1, E2, E3 and E4)
  6. Promote and encourage sustainable travel choices through the requirement of travel plans to increase walking, cycling and the promotion of public transport routes connecting new garden communities to the town and beyond. New development should be planned around a user hierarchy that places pedestrians and cyclists at the top. Consideration should also be given to delivering electric vehicle infrastructure in new development and disability discrimination requirements. Policies T1, T2, T3, T4, T5, T6 and T7 should be taken into account
  7. New garden communities should be designed to be easily accessible and create sociable, vibrant and walkable neighbourhoods with equality of access for all to a range of community service and facilities including health, education, retail, culture, community meeting spaces, multifunctional open space, sports and leisure facilities and well connected to public transport. Policies I2 and I3 should be taken into account. Site-specific supplementary planning documents (SPDs) will be developed as required to set out clear and detailed requirements for place-making
  8. Creation of distinctive environments which seek to achieve a minimum of 50% land within the proposed garden communities as local and strategic green infrastructure which should be designed as multifunctional, accessible, and maximise benefits such as wildlife, recreation and water management. This will include land required to mitigate the ecological and flood risk impacts of development. Management regimes should be developed in tandem with the detailed development of GI for each of the garden communities. Policies I1, I2, I3, NE1, NE2, NE3, NE4 and NE5 should be taken into account. Site-specific SPDs will be developed as required to set out clear and detailed requirements for place-making
  9. Establishing opportunities for appropriate and sustainable governance and stewardship arrangement for community assets including green space, public realm, community and other relevant facilities. Such arrangements should be funded by developments and include community representation
  10. To preserve or enhance heritage assets including through mitigation as required.

South Aylesbury

View Comments (3) 4.30 'South Aylesbury' is allocated as a strategic site for Aylesbury and contributes to the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town.  The allocation comprises the following HELAA sites:

  • Land south of Stoke Mandeville Hospital (SMD004)
  • Land around Red House Farm, Lower Road (SMD005)
  • Land north of Stoke Mandeville adjacent Lower Road (SMD006)
  • Land south of Aylesbury adjacent to Wendover Road (SMD007)
  • Land between railway line and Wendover Road (SMD008)
  • Land straddling railway line north of Stoke Mandeville (SMD016)

No Comments 4.31 It also includes the remainder of land to the west up to the railway line, which has not been formally promoted to the Council but is included to contribute to delivering a comprehensive development scheme on this site. The site and its immediate surroundings are level with no significant topography.  The site therefore has an open aspect.  Views beyond to the east and west continue across open countryside.  There are no flood risk areas identified in the site and drainage is achieved via a series of small ditches.  The site is currently in agricultural use with no significant biodiversity value.  There is currently no vehicular circulation into or across the site.  One public right of way exists across the site and uses a level crossing to cross the railway line.  The edges of the site are mainly a variety of residential rear boundaries.  In addition, the north western edge is with Stoke Mandeville Hospital, with car parking and rear facades of the hospital buildings predominating.  The southern edge adjoining Stoke Mandeville village is mixed residential rear boundaries and some existing green spaces.  The site is also bounded by Lower Road to the west and Wendover Road to the east.

No Comments 4.32 The sites are merged to enable a comprehensive, cohesive and co-ordinated approach to the development of the site as a whole.  It offers benefits for infrastructure co-ordination and delivery, allowing the total infrastructure needs of the allocation as a whole to be considered and planned for, rather than a piecemeal approach that would flow from a site-by-site approach.

No Comments 4.33 Given the large number of smaller sites that make up this allocation, an overall masterplan SPD will be essential to ensure a co-ordinated and comprehensive approach to development, and to guide phasing of the site.

No Comments 4.34 The site is to come forward in the later years of the plan, as it is dependent on the delivery of infrastructure related to the development of HS2. The Masterplan SPD will provide further guidance and information on phasing.

No Comments 4.35 Parts of the overall site have individual planning applications which are at varying stages.  SMD004 has an as-yet undetermined application for 125 dwellings (16/04608/AOP). SMD018 has outline planning permission for 117 dwellings.

No Comments 4.36 Regard should be had to the layout and access arrangements for these sites as appropriate in the preparation of the Masterplan for this strategic site allocation to ensure a comprehensive approach to development.

View Comments (3) 4.37 A Master Plan SPD for the site will establish the site layout and disposition of land uses. The development will adhere to the following place-shaping principles:

  • integration between the existing built-up area of Aylesbury and new development
  • maintain the settings and individual identity of Stoke Mandeville
  • connections to existing footpaths and cycleways and to public transport, enabling sustainable travel
  • take account of long-distance views across the site to the Chilterns AONB
  • respond positively to the best characteristics of the surrounding area
  • provision of green corridors linking development with the surrounding communities and wider countryside.

View Comments (1) 4.38 The vision and objectives for the site are set out below:

  • To create a new comprehensively planned garden community in an urban extension to the town which is derived from the field pattern and landscape features on the site.
  • The design and layout of the site should take account of the proximity to lower density housing in Stoke Mandeville and the existing edge of Aylesbury.
  • The site layout and design should also take account with key long-distance views to the Chiltern Hills.
  • The scheme will also enable the delivery of a distributor road between Lower Road and Wendover Road to cross the railway line.
  • Creating a high quality built and semi-natural environment, providing high quality housing for both the private and social sectors as well as provision of new community facilities.
  • The site will be opened up to a range of open spaces, including the new linear park, and have been carefully designed to respect the identity and character of existing urban area.
  • This mixed use development is in a highly accessible location that reinforces the town's infrastructure and provides homes, community facilities and recreational opportunities for its future residents and neighbours.

View Comments (44) D-AGT1 South Aylesbury

Site Ref:

AGT1

Site Name:

South Aylesbury

Size (hectares)

Approximately 95 ha

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

  • 1,000 dwellings
  • One primary school
  • Multi-functional green infrastructure
  • Link road between Lower Road and Wendover Road
  • Aylesbury South East Link Road (A413 to B4443 Lower Road)
  • Local centre
  • Cycling and walking links

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site.  In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. Provision of land for around 1,000 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. Provision of 5 Gypsy and Traveller pitches
  3. Provision of a dual carriageway distributor road between Lower Road and Wendover Road to cross the railway line
  4. Provision of new access points into the sites
  5. Provision for public transport into the town and to surrounding areas
  6. Existing vegetation should be retained where practicable, including existing woodlands and hedgerows. Existing public rights of way need to be retained and integrated into the development within safe and secure environments as part of a wider network of sustainable routes, to directly and appropriately link the site with surrounding communities and facilities
  7. Proposals must retain and enhance existing habitats where practicable, including the creation of linkages with surrounding wildlife assets
  8. Provision and management of 50% green infrastructure to link to other new development areas and the wider countryside
  9. The development should be designed using a landscape-led approach including consideration of the long-distance views of the AONB
  10. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm 1 in 20, 100 and 1,000 year extents and 1 in 100 year plus climate change extents on the ordinary watercourse (see SFRA Level 2)
  11. Surface water modelling should be undertaken to define the level of surface water risk and the risk areas/flow paths. Climate change should be modelled using the +40% allowance (February 2016) for rainfall intensity. A surface water drainage strategy should ensure that the development does not increase flood risk elsewhere. Opportunity to mitigate against potential surface water flooding of Stoke Mandeville Hospital
  12. Risk of overtopping or breach of the Aylesbury Arm (Grand Union Canal) should be modelled
  13. The development should be designed using a sequential approach. Flood Zones 2 and 3, and 3a plus climate change (subject to a detailed flood risk assessment) should be preserved as green space, with built development restricted to Flood Zone 1
  14. Drainage designs should 'design for exceedance' and accommodate existing surface water flow routes, with development located outside surface water flood areas
  15. Provision of buffer between the new development and Stoke Mandeville

provision of land, buildings and car parking for a combined primary school, including playing field provision

  1. Provision of land, buildings and car parking for a new local centre, including community hall
  2. Provision of on-site health facilities and community buildings (including temporary buildings if necessary)
  3. Provision of and contribution to infrastructure as appropriate.

Implementation Approach

Development of the South Aylesbury Strategic Site Allocation will come forward towards the latter end of the Plan period, and only once a Masterplan SPD for the allocation has been prepared and adopted by the Council.

Proposals for development within the South Aylesbury Strategic Site Allocation will be expected to demonstrate how they positively contribute to the achievement of the SPD and the Aylesbury Garden Town Principles as set out in Policies D1 and D2.  Any development on this site should be in accordance with the overarching policies and principles for the development of Aylesbury Garden Town.


South west Aylesbury

No Comments 4.39 'South west Aylesbury' is allocated as a strategic allocation for Aylesbury and contributes to the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town.

View Comments (1) 4.40 The allocation comprises the following sites:

  • Land between Oxford Road, Standalls Farm and Aylesbury – up to 1,382 dwellings
  • Land at Lower Road Aylesbury – already committed for 190 dwellings
  • Land between Marsh Lane, Princes Risborough Railway Line and Aylesbury – up to 168 dwellings.

No Comments 4.41 One of the reasons for merging the sites is to enable a more comprehensive approach to development in this area, and to improve co-ordination and location of infrastructure and services. The site provides an opportunity for a sustainable extension integrated with, and supportive of, the existing community, bringing a wide range of benefits in a manner that makes the best use of existing resources and infrastructure.

View Comments (1) 4.42 The majority of the allocation is planned to come forward later in the Plan period especially due to the relationship to and dependence on the delivery of HS2.  The site comprises agricultural land located to the south and south-west of the built-up area of Aylesbury. To the north-east lies existing residential development fronting Lower Road, Bucks CC Sports Club and playing fields and Booker Park School. Part of the site wraps around the existing commercial buildings of the Fountain Business Centre and Stoke Mandeville Auto Centre. To the west and south lies open countryside.

View Comments (1) 4.43 The site boundaries are defined by established hedgerows with occasional hedgerow trees There are existing public footpaths which cross the fields to the west and south of the site. Two listed buildings are associated with Hall End Farmhouse and Stoke Cottage. Hartwell House historic park and garden and Hartwell conservation area and numerous listed buildings are located due west of the site. The HS2 route forming the southern boundary to the site could be a significant constraint and will have a potential effect on the developable area and mitigation. A noise buffer will be required  which will reduce the developable area of the site. Delivery of access to the site will need to take into account the differing levels between the realigned A410 and the underpass of the Aylesbury to Princes Risborough railway line. This needs to be fully considered through the preparation of the SPD.  There is an area of flood risk zone to the north of the site, from the Stoke Brook and surface water and groundwater flood risk as set out in the SFRA Level 2. Overhead power lines bisect the site to the south-west.  The areas of the site in Flood Zones 2 and 3 and HS2 buffer zone will only be suitable for green infrastructure, a strategic link road and footpaths. There are existing hedges and mature trees including black poplars and these features must be retained. Highways impacts on Marsh Lane and sustainable transport options into Aylesbury need to be addressed.

No Comments 4.44 Current planning status:

  • Land at Lower Road subject to planning application.
  • Remaining land at South west Aylesbury – application due December 2017.
No Comments 4.45 At the site known as Lower Road all 190 dwellings will be delivered in years one to five of the Plan period.  The remainder of the site will commence delivery within the end of the first 10 years of the Plan, with the majority delivered in 10-15 years. Careful consideration needs to be given to the phasing and the impact of HS2 on this and co-ordination of the delivery of the whole site through the Masterplan and Delivery SPD.

No Comments 4.46 The concept plan sets out the key components for the site: the strategic road links within the site are included, along with the route of HS2, linear park and area of flood mitigation. It sets out the location of the key land use elements of the site particularly employment; housing, schools and the green infrastructure.

View Comments (2) 4.47 The Masterplan SPD for the site will establish more detail with regard to the site layout and disposition of land uses. The development will adhere to the following place-shaping principles:
  • Integration of new development with the existing build area of Aylesbury, and the surrounding countryside
  • Consideration of the impact of HS2 and flood risk on the site
  • Provide sustainable connections to existing urban area and to the countryside beyond through provision of cycleways, footpaths and access to public transport
  • Take account of long-distance views across the site to the Chilterns AONB
  • Respond positively to the best characteristics of the surrounding area
  • Provision of green corridors linking development with surrounding communities.

No Comments 4.48 Infrastructure will be provided alongside development – details to be determined through site discussions.

View Comments (1) 4.49 The vision and objectives for the site are set out below:

  • To create a new garden community derived from the field pattern and mature landscape features on the site.
  • The design and layout of the site should take account of the proximity to lower density housing in Stoke Mandeville and the existing edge of Aylesbury. The site layout and design should also take account of key long-distance views to the Chiltern Hills, and also the new hard boundary of the site with HS2 and the associated linear park alongside it.
  • The scheme will also enable the delivery of the South West Link Road, relieving traffic pressures in the town centre and enabling easier vehicular movement around Aylesbury.
  • The site will improve and mitigate existing flood risk, and provide flood alleviation to Stoke Brook, through diversion of the brook and appropriate complementary measures, such as attenuation lakes, which provide betterment to the existing community.
  • Creating a high quality built and semi-natural environment, providing high quality housing for both the private and social sectors as well as provision of new community facilities.
  • The site will be opened up to a range of open spaces, including the new linear park, and have been carefully designed to respect the identity and character of the existing urban area.
  • Further flood mitigation measures that will benefit the site and also cover part of the town will be provided, in addition to a sustainable urban drainage system to meet the needs of the development.
  • This mixed use development is in a highly accessible location that reinforces the town's infrastructure and provides homes, community facilities and recreational opportunities for its future residents and neighbours.

View Comments (20) D-AGT2: South west Aylesbury

Site Ref:

AGT2

Site Name:

South west Aylesbury

Size (hectares)

Total site area: 112.66ha

Land between Oxford Road, Standalls Farm and Aylesbury South: 94.1ha

Land at Lower Road Aylesbury: 9.2ha

Land between Marsh Lane, Princes Risborough Railway and Aylesbury: 11.6ha

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

  • Around 1,550 dwellings
  • One primary school
  • Multi-functional green infrastructure (totalling 56.33ha)
  • Strategic flood defences and surface water attenuation
  • South West Link Road between Stoke Mandeville A4010 realignment and A418 Oxford Road single carriageway (safeguarded for future dualling)Junction improvements at A413 and A418
  • Provision of a linear park
  • Buffer zone for HS2 and noise mitigation
  • Cycling and walking links

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site.  In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. Provision for land for around 1,550 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity.
  2. Provision of five Gypsy and Traveller pitches
  3. Consideration must be given to the provision of a buffer and associated mitigation to reduce the impact on HS2 on the residents
  4. Provision of land, building and car parking for one primary school with a pre-school, funding to support for a children's centre, upper school provision, grammar school provision, and expansion of existing special schools
  5. Existing vegetation should be retained where practicable, including woodlands and hedgerows. Existing public rights of way need to be retained and integrated into the development within safe and secure environments as part of a wider network of sustainable routes, to directly and appropriately link the site with surrounding communities and facilities.
  6. Proposals must retain and enhance existing habitats where practicable, including the creation of linkages with surrounding wildlife assets
  7. The development should be designed using a landscape-led approach including consideration of the long-distance views of the AONB
  8. Provision for public transport into the town and to surrounding areas
  9. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm flood zone and climate change extents. The Environment Agency and lead local flood authority should be consulted to obtain the latest hydraulic modelling for the site at the time of the flood risk assessment. They will advise as to whether existing detailed models need to be updated
  10. The development should be designed using a sequential approach. Flood Zones 2 and 3 and 3a plus climate change (subject to detailed flood risk assessment) should be preserved as green space with built development restricted to Flood Zone 1
  11. Residual risk to the site should be investigated, for example overtopping or breach of the Aylesbury Vale Flood Alleviation Scheme storage areas, risk of overtopping or breach from the Aylesbury Arm (Grand Union Canal), impact of blockage of the A418 culvert on flood risk and deployment of the temporary barriers at the Willows
  12. Flood alleviation through measures identified in the SFRA Level 2 for investigation including through flood alleviation system benefitting the wider community and provision of sustainable drainage systems (SUDS) will be required to reduce pressure on the existing drainage network
  13. Surface water modelling should be undertaken to define the level of surface water risk and the risk areas/flow paths. Climate change should be modelled using the +40% allowance (February 2016) for rainfall intensity. A surface water drainage strategy should ensure that the development does not increase flood risk elsewhere
  14. A site drainage strategy should consider whether infiltration is feasible under all groundwater conditions and a site investigation carried out  to identify likely groundwater levels. A potential detailed hydrogeological assessment may be required, subject to the outcomes of the site investigation. The site should be designed with consideration of potentially high groundwater levels, subject to the above. An assessment of modifications in the behaviour of the groundwater system underlying the site carried out due to the development and any proposed mitigation, together with assessment of off-site implications/impacts on groundwater flood risk, particularly to the communities of Walton Court, Southcourt and the Willows to the north.  A drainage strategy should assess and detail the  management of the above groundwater findings together with interactions with surface water and watercourses
  15. The impact of the blockage of the culvert under the railway should be modelled
  16. New major transport infrastructure such as Stoke Mandeville A4010 realignment, A413-A418 Link Road and HS2 should be designed so that the potential loss of floodplain and change of flow pathways resulting from their implementation do not have an adverse effect on flood risk. They should also be designed to ensure that they remain operational and safe for users in times of flood
  17. Provision and management of 50% green infrastructure to link to other new development areas and the wider countryside
  18. Provision of on-site health facilities and community buildings (including temporary buildings if necessary)
  19. Provision of and contribution to infrastructure as appropriate.

Implementation Approach

Development of the South west Aylesbury Strategic Site Allocation will come forward towards the latter end of the Plan period, and only once a Masterplan and Delivery SPD for the allocation has been prepared and adopted by the Council.

Proposals for development within the South west Aylesbury Strategic Site Allocation will be expected to demonstrate how they positively contribute to the achievement of the SPD and the Aylesbury Garden Town Principles as set out in Policy D1.

Aylesbury north of A41

No Comments 4.50 'Aylesbury north of A41' is a strategic allocation on the eastern side of Aylesbury and contributes to the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town.

View Comments (1) 4.51 The allocation comprises the following sites:

  • Woodlands: allocated for 1,100 dwellings and 102,800 sqm of employment land alongside infrastructure. This site will form a key development area of employment and custom build housing to support the growth of the Garden Town
  • Manor Farm: allocated for 350 dwellings
  • Westonmead Farm: allocated for 60 dwellings
  • College Farm: allocated for 250 dwellings

No Comments 4.52 Alongside the Woodlands site the allocation also includes sites at Weston Mead Farm, Manor Farm Broughton and College Farm. One of the reasons for merging the sites is to enable a more comprehensive approach to development in this area and to improve co-ordination and location of infrastructure and services. The site provides an opportunity for a sustainable extension integrated with, and supportive of, the existing community, bringing a wide range of benefits in a manner that makes the best use of existing resources and infrastructure.  The site covers an extensive area of predominately flat greenfield land within agricultural land use sited to the east of Aylesbury. Although mainly agricultural, the eastern portion of the site adjoining College Road North is included within the Arla/Woodlands Enterprise Zone designation which also extends over an existing employment area centred on the Arla dairy.

View Comments (1) 4.53 The site is bounded to the south beyond residential dwellings located on the A41 Aston Clinton Road, and further along to the east, the A41 Aston Clinton bypass. To the north, the site is bounded by the Grand Union Canal which runs in an east-west direction. To the west is the eastern urban fringe of Aylesbury. To the east, the site is bounded by College Road North and the commercial developments along this road, most notably the Arla processing dairy, and College Farm. Residential properties located near to the site are situated along the A41 Aston Clinton Road, Weston Mead Farm to the south-west of the site and College Farm and The Red House to the east of the site off College Road North.

No Comments 4.54 The tow path along the Grand Union Canal is a public right of way (PROW) which runs in an east-west direction. To the south of the site in a north-south direction is a PROW extending from Aston Clinton Aylesbury Road and College Road South up to College Road North. Beyond the site to the north is a further PROW extending in an east-west direction and to the west, extending from the A41 in a north-south direction, is a PROW across fields towards Broughton.

No Comments 4.55 The site is within Flood Zones 1, 2 and 3. Flood Zones 2 and 3 are located predominately to the west of the site. A network of drains conveys surface water run-off from the central area of the site to the north-west to Burcott Brook. The principal watercourse in the area is Bear Brook which lies to the west of the site flowing into Aylesbury. Burcott Brook also flows through the north-western part of the site and passes beneath the canal. Drayton Mead Brook is located to the east and drains the area in the vicinity of College Farm.

View Comments (1) 4.56 The Aylesbury Arm of the Grand Union Canal runs along the north of the site and has a number of listed and non-listed bridges along this stretch.

No Comments 4.57 The site has a simple fabric of large, open fields bounded by hedgerows and ditches and drained by two watercourses: Bear Brook and Burcott Brook. Mature trees, including black poplar, are included in this fabric along with a small area of plantation woodland. The site also has long-distance view to the Chiltern Hills.

No Comments 4.58 There are a number of existing overhead lines which run across the site as well as buried electrical cables within the A41 Woodlands roundabout. This roundabout also contains a medium pressure gas main; this is the only gas pipeline within the development site.

No Comments 4.59 The area of the site known as Woodlands has a current planning application, 16/01040/AOP, as yet undetermined.   It proposes up to 102,800 sqm of employment land, a strategic link road connecting with the ELR (N) and the A41 Aston Clinton Road, transport infrastructure, landscape, open space, flood mitigation and drainage, and up to 1,100 dwellings (including custom and self build units), and a 60-bed care home/extra care facility.

No Comments 4.60 Development of this site will commence within the first five years of the Plan period, and will complete by the end of the Plan period.

No Comments 4.61 Detail about phasing and implementation will be set out in the Masterplan SPD for the site.

View Comments (1) 4.62 The concept plan sets out the key components for the site: the strategic road links within the site are included identifying the area of flood mitigation. It sets out the location of the key land use elements of the site particularly employment; housing, schools and the green infrastructure.

View Comments (2) 4.63 The Masterplan SPD for the site will establish more detail with regard to the site layout and disposition of land uses. The development will adhere to the following place-shaping principles:

  • Integration of new development with the existing build area of Aylesbury, and the surrounding countryside
  • Provision of employment to support the growth of the Garden Town
  • Provide sustainable connections to existing urban area and to the countryside beyond through provision of cycleways, footpaths and access to public transport
  • Take account of long-distance views across the site to the Chilterns AONB
  • Respond positively to the best characteristics of the surrounding area
  • Provision of green corridors linking development with surrounding communities.

No Comments 4.64 Infrastructure will be provided alongside development – details to be determined through site discussions.

View Comments (2) 4.65 The vision and objectives for the site are set out below:

  • A new garden community to the eastern edge of Aylesbury.
  • An opportunity to provide much-needed infrastructure and employment for the Garden Town.
  • This will provide a self-contained, employment-led, highly sustainable, community giving people who choose to live or work here easy access on foot or cycle to day-to-day facilities, all within an exceptional environment.
  • The development will also provide high-quality homes to diversify Aylesbury's housing offer, with custom/self build, organised around a strong local centre and set within recreational space, sports facilities and green infrastructure networks which make up more than half of the development's total site area.
  • It will deliver over 100,000sqm of high quality commercial development, a new sports village and a viable mix of around 1,660 private and affordable dwellings and associated physical and social infrastructure.
  • Through delivery of the Eastern Link Road South (ELR(S)) the site will reduce congestion and improve the quality of the town centre environment.
  • By developing landmark sporting facilities with associated athletes' accommodation, development will build upon the Paralympic sporting heritage of Aylesbury and Stoke Mandeville.
  • Green corridors for wildlife and people will link and extend the network of existing green infrastructure connecting and contributing to the Aylesbury linear park. The new community will capture  the value of the Grand Union Canal by creating a new canal-side destination and bringing water into the design.

View Comments (52) D-AGT3: Aylesbury north of A41

Site Ref:

AGT3

Site Name:

Aylesbury north of A41

Size (hectares)

Total site: 253.5ha

Woodlands: 200ha

Manor Farm: 29.1ha

Westonmead Farm: 11.5ha

College Farm: 12.9ha

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

  • Around 102,800 sqm of employment land (B1 (25,600sqm), B2 (44,400 sqm) and B8 (32,800 sqm))
  • Around 1,660 dwellings (including custom and self build units)
  • 60 residential extra care units (Use Class C2)
  • Mixed use local centre of around 4,000 sqm (Use Classes A1, A2, A5 and D1
  • Strategic link road connecting with the ELR (N) and the A41 Aston Clinton Road
  • Strategic flood defences
  • Around 5,000 sqm hotel and conference centre (Use Class C1)
  • A local centre
  • Around 16ha for sports village and pitches
  • Athletes' accommodation
  • Around 2ha for a two-form entry primary school (D1)
  • Open space totalling 0.2ha play areas, 74.2ha informal open spaces, 16.7ha formal open spaces, 1.2ha allotments/community orchards, and 5.5ha woodland area
  • Landscape buffers and ecological mitigation
  • Flood mitigation and drainage including sustainable drainage systems (SuDS)
  • Cycling and walking links

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site. In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. Provision for land for around 1,660 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity. The development should be integrated with the existing build area of Aylesbury, and maintain the settings and individual identity of Aston Clinton, Broughton and the existing urban edge
  2. Provision of a distributor road between the ELR (N) and the A41 Aston Clinton Road and any related highway improvements
  3. Provision of land, building and car parking for one primary school with a pre-school, funding to support a children's centre, upper school provision, grammar school provision, and expansion of existing special schools
  4. Existing vegetation should be retained where practicable, including existing woodlands and hedgerows. Existing public rights of way need to be retained and integrated into the development within safe and secure environments as part of a wider network of sustainable routes, to directly and appropriately link the site with surrounding communities and facilities
  5. Proposals must retain and enhance existing habitats where practicable, including the creation of linkages with surrounding wildlife assets
  6. The development should be designed using a landscape-led approach including consideration of the long distance views of the AONB
  7. Provision for public transport into the town and to surrounding areas. Active travel links to be established to Broughton Lane, the Garden Community and the Aylesbury Arm of the Grand Union Canal
  8. Town-wide flood defences through a flood alleviation system benefitting the wider community and provision of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) will be required to reduce pressure on the existing drainage network
  9. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm flood zone and climate change extents. The Environment Agency and lead local flood authority should be consulted to obtain the latest hydraulic modelling for the site at the time of the flood risk assessment. They will advise as to whether existing detailed models need to be updated
  10. Reservoir flood risk to the site should be investigated, for example overtopping or breach of the Weston Turville Reservoir and also canal flood risk of overtopping or breach of the Aylesbury Arm (Grand Union Canal). The impact of blockage of the siphon under the canal or blockage of the culverted ordinary watercourse in the centre of the Woodlands part of the site should be considered. Mitigation for reservoir flood risk should be discussed with the Environment Agency
  11. The development should be designed using a sequential approach. Flood Zones 2 and 3 and 3a plus climate change (subject to detailed flood risk assessment) should be preserved as green space with built development restricted to Flood Zone 1
  12. New major transport infrastructure such as Eastern Link Road should be designed so that the potential loss of floodplain and change of flow pathways resulting from their implementation do not have an adverse effect on flood risk. They should also be designed to ensure that they remain operational and safe for users in times of flood
  13. Resilience measures will be required to ensure that development is safe if buildings are situated within Flood Zone 2
  14. A surface water drainage strategy should ensure that the development does not increase flood risk elsewhere
  15. Provision and management of 50% green infrastructure to link to other new development areas and the wider countryside.  The site will also deliver a 16ha sports village and pitches
  16. Landscape buffers to Broughton, Eastern Link Road and ecological mitigation supporting Kingsbrook
  17. Development restricted to the southern half of the site and the built-up area of the former farm buildings
  18. Landscape buffers to existing development on the northern part of the site at Westonmead Farm to integrate into open space proposals included with the Woodlands development proposals
  19. Appropriate ecological mitigation
  20. Provision of on-site health facilities and community buildings (including temporary buildings if necessary)
  21. Provision of and contribution to infrastructure as appropriate

Implementation Approach

Development of the Aylesbury north of the A41 strategic site allocation will come forward towards the latter end of the Plan period, in accordance with the Masterplan and Delivery SPD for the allocation that has been prepared and adopted by the Council.

Proposals for development within this strategic site allocation will be expected to demonstrate how they positively contribute to the achievement of the SPD and the Aylesbury Garden Town Principles as set out in Policy D1.

Aylesbury south of A41

No Comments 4.66 'Aylesbury south of A41' is a strategic allocation for Aylesbury and contributes to the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town.

View Comments (2) 4.67 The allocation comprises the following sites: 

  • the first is the major development area known as Hampden Fields which allocates 3,000 homes and 46,800 sqm of employment. This site will form a vital urban extension to Aylesbury, integral to the town's Garden Town status
  • the second site known as  'Land adjacent to Aston Clinton Holiday Inn' will deliver 60 homes
  • the third known as  'Land at New Road Weston Turville' will deliver a further 51 homes.

No Comments 4.68 One of the reasons for merging the sites is to enable a more comprehensive approach to development in this area, and to improve co-ordination and location of infrastructure and services. The site provides an opportunity for a sustainable extension integrated with, and supportive of, the existing community, bringing a wide range of benefits in a manner that makes the best use of existing resources and infrastructure. To the south of the site lies the village of Weston Turville, separated from the site by Weston Turville Golf Club and agricultural land.  To the north are Bedgrove and Bedgrove Park, and to the east the A41 Aston Clinton Road. Immediately to the west is the Hampden Hall residential development and the south-western edge of the site runs parallel with Wendover Road abutting short sections of the road, housing and fields to the rear of housing.

No Comments 4.69 Current land use is predominantly agricultural land (a mixture of Grade 3a and 3b quality), mostly arable fields but with some pasture fields in the northern part of the site.  There is an historic field pattern that varies from east to west: fields are defined by hedgerows with occasional trees.  The site also supports one small plantation in its southern part, one small copse of amenity woodland in its northern part and one field in its western part that comprises rough grassland, emerging woodland and a collection of fruit and other ornamental trees. 

No Comments 4.70 The site is dissected by the unclassified New Road which runs south-north between Weston Turville and the A41 Aston Clinton Road.  There are two public footpaths within the site.

No Comments 4.71 The watercourses of Bedgrove Brook and West End Ditch run through the site and Wendover Brook passes alongside the south-eastern site boundary.  There are also a number of drainage ditches within the site.

No Comments 4.72 The site is located outside of the settlement boundary of Aylesbury in open countryside.  It has no other policy designations in the adopted Local Plan.

No Comments 4.73 Currently this site is the subject of two planning applications:

  • Hampden Fields outline planning application (under consideration) reference 16/00424/AOP
  • Land adjacent to Holiday Inn, planning application (under consideration) reference 16/03388/AOP.

No Comments 4.74 The site will commence delivery within the end of the first five years, with the whole scheme being delivered by the end of the Plan period.

No Comments 4.75 Careful consideration needs to be given to phasing and co-ordination of the delivery of the whole site through the Masterplan and Delivery SPD.

No Comments 4.76 To ensure a comprehensive approach to development, consideration should be given to how the sites relate to each other and to ensure the sites take account of one another.

View Comments (2) 4.77 The concept plan sets out the key components for the site: the strategic road links within the site should be included, along with the location of the key land use elements of the site, particularly employment, housing, schools and the green infrastructure. The development will adhere to the following place-shaping principles:

  • Integration of new development with the existing build area of Aylesbury, and maintain the settings and individual identity of Stoke Mandeville and Weston Turville
  • Provide sustainable connections to existing urban area and to the countryside beyond through provision of cycleways, footpaths and access to public transport
  • Take account of long-distance views across the site to the Chilterns AONB
  • Respond positively to the best characteristics of the surrounding area
  • Provision of green corridors linking development with surrounding communities.

No Comments 4.78 Infrastructure will be provided alongside development – details to be determined through site discussions. 

View Comments (1) 4.79 The vision and objectives for the site are set out below:

  • To create an urban extension to the town which is derived from the field pattern and mature landscape features on the site, the proximity to lower density housing in Stoke Mandeville and Weston Turville, together with key long-distance views to the Chiltern Hills AONB
  • A mixed use development in a highly accessible location, that reinforces the town's infrastructure, and provides homes, community facilities and recreational and employment opportunities for its future residents and neighbours
  • Creating a high quality built and semi-natural environment, providing high quality housing for both the private and social sectors as well as provision of new community facilities including schools and a new local centre which will include a range of facilities for future residents and workers
  • Proposed employment development is provided in a strategic location which should be attractive to occupiers who seek an accessible, high quality location
  • The scheme will also enable the delivery of the Southern Link Road and provides space for a new park & ride off the Aston Clinton Road (A41), relieving traffic pressures in the town centre and enabling easier vehicular movement
  • The site will be opened up to a range of new parks and other open spaces, that have been carefully designed to respect the identity and character of Weston Turville
  • Town wide flood mitigation measures are proposed in addition to a sustainable urban drainage system to meet the needs of the development.

View Comments (46) D-AGT4 Aylesbury south of A41

Site Ref:

AGT4

Site Name:

Aylesbury south of A41

Size (hectares)

Total site area: 225.5ha

Hampden Fields: 218ha

Land adjacent to Aston Clinton Holiday Inn: 5.79ha

Land at New Road, Weston Turville: 1.7ha

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

  • Around 3,111dwellings
  • 60-bed care home/extra care facility
  • Land for a park & ride site
  • 6.90ha of employment land
  • Two primary schools
  • A mixed use local centre
  • Multi-functional green infrastructure (totalling 108.43ha)
  • Strategic flood defences and surface water attenuation
  • A dualled Southern Link Road between A413 Wendover Road and A41 Aston Clinton Road and a strategic link road between the Southern Link Road and Marroway
  • Cycling and walking links

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site.  In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. Provision of land for around 3,111 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity. The development should be integrated with the existing build area of Aylesbury, and maintain the settings and individual identity of Stoke Mandeville and Weston Turville
  2. Provision of land, building and car parking for two primary schools each with a pre-school, a children's centre on one of the primary school sites and funding to support upper school provision, grammar school provision, and expansion of existing special schools
  3. Existing vegetation should be retained where practicable, including existing woodlands and hedgerows. Existing public rights of way need to be retained and integrated into the development within safe and secure environments as part of a wider network of sustainable routes, to directly and appropriately link the site with surrounding communities and facilities
  4. Proposals must retain and enhance existing habitats where practicable, including the creation of linkages with surrounding wildlife assets. This includes the wildlife area within Bedgrove Park
  5. The development should be designed using a landscape-led approach including consideration of the long-distance views of the AONB
  6. Provision for public transport into the town and to surrounding areas
  7. Town-wide flood defences through a flood alleviation system benefitting the wider community and provision of sustainable drainage system (SuDS) will be required to reduce pressure on the existing drainage network
  8. Provision and management of 50% green infrastructure to link to other new development areas and the wider countryside
  9. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm flood zone and climate change extents. The Environment Agency and lead local flood authority should be consulted to obtain the latest hydraulic modelling for the site at the time of the flood risk assessment. They will advise as to whether existing detailed models need to be updated
  10. Residual risk to the site and reservoir flood risk to the site should be investigated, for example overtopping or breach of the Weston Turville Reservoir
  11. The impact of blockage of structure(s) under Aston Clinton Road and on Bedgrove Road should also be modelled
  12. Surface water modelling should be undertaken to define the level of surface water risk and the risk areas/flow paths. Climate change should be modelled using the +40% allowance (February 2016) for rainfall intensity. A surface water drainage strategy should ensure that the development does not increase flood risk elsewhere
  13. The development should be designed using a sequential approach. Flood Zones 2 and 3 and 3a plus climate change (subject to detailed flood risk assessment) should be preserved as green space with built development restricted to Flood Zone 1
  14. New major transport infrastructure such as Eastern Link Road should be designed so that the potential loss of floodplain and change of flow pathways resulting from their implementation do not have an adverse effect on flood risk. They should also be designed to ensure that they remain operational and safe for users in times of flood
  15. Drainage designs should 'design for exceedance' and accommodate existing surface water flow routes, with development located outside of surface water flood risk areas
  16. Provision of on-site health facilities and community buildings (including temporary buildings if necessary)
  17. Provision of and contribution to infrastructure as appropriate.

Implementation Approach

Development at Hampden Fields and Land adjacent to the Holiday Inn should be brought forward in accordance with their outline planning consent and the Aylesbury Garden Town principles in Policy D1. A Masterplan SPD for the whole site allocation should be prepared and adopted to inform the submission of design codes and reserved matters for these sites, and prior to the submission of any planning applications for the New Road site.

Design should take account of the over-arching Garden Town principles (policy D1) and details within the Garden Town Design SPD to ensure a comprehensive development. The SPD for the overall site allocation here should be prepared to ensure a comprehensively planned development as well as demonstrating how the allocation links to and contributes to the delivery of the AGT overall.

Berryfields, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.80 'Berryfields, Aylesbury' is identified as a strategic allocation for Aylesbury, and contributes to the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town.

No Comments 4.81 The Berryfields Major Development Area (MDA) is situated to the north-west of Aylesbury. The development includes 3,254 new dwellings, employment, a district centre, schools, transport infrastructure and open space and community facilities. The site is situated off the A41 to the north-west of Aylesbury.

No Comments 4.82 The site was allocated within the 2004 Aylesbury Vale District Local Plan (AVDLP) which allocated greenfield land beyond the existing urban edge of Aylesbury to accommodate growth of the town. The policy set out a sustainable strategy for the Berryfields site which identified development of a balanced, vibrant community, grouping a mix of uses together and providing for most daily needs in the locality.

View Comments (1) 4.83 Over half the housing on the site has been completed and reserved matters have been granted for the remainder of the housing at Berryfields. There are approximately 1,180 dwellings still to come forward. While some of the other planned requirements, including education, community and transport, are in place there has been limited progress on providing the local centre and employment areas.

View Comments (1) 4.84 The site comprises agricultural land. There are hedgerows and trees at some of the field boundaries. The site includes a number of dispersed farmhouses and agricultural buildings. A network of water courses divide the site, principally the River Thame that flows along the southern edge of the site. Three footpaths cross the site east of Berryfields Lane and run north towards Hardwick. A slight ridge exists towards the northern end of the site and there is a rise in ground levels from Berryfields Farm and Berryfields house. There are also two specific areas of archaeological interest to be retained.

No Comments 4.85 2,070 dwellings and the western link road have already been developed, with 1,184 dwellings still to be built. There are extant planning permissions (outline consent under 03/02386/AOP, 07/03447/AOP and subsequent reserved matters) for the following:

  • provision of land, buildings and car parking sufficient for a district centre (including 1,400 sqm net food retail floorspace), and other community/leisure facilities on a site as defined on the Policies Map
  • provision of land (approximately 9ha) for employment purposes on two sites as defined on the Policies Map

No Comments 4.86 Provision of the district centre and employment allocation set out above should be within the first five years of the Plan period and be in accordance with the Masterplan for the site which will establish the concept plan outlining proposals for both employment allocation and district centre.

No Comments 4.87 The vision and objectives for the site are outlined below:

  • To create an efficient, attractive and sustainable environment in which to live, work and play, taking the form of development comprising distinctive linked / coalesced 'urban villages' reflecting local distinctiveness (with regards to pattern and form of development and building form and materials), set within a unifying planning and design framework.
  • To achieve a diversity of layout and design which reflects the range of 'local distinctiveness'
  • To recognise the proximity to the new railway station
  • To retain the existing employment allocation providing opportunities to work locally and thus reduce the need to travel. Community facilities to come forward within a neighbourhood centre to provide local facilities to create a sustainable garden community.

No Comments 4.88 Promoting healthy, vibrant communities remains a key element of planning policy and in this context the original sustainable concepts behind the allocation of Berryfields remain relevant through to the time the development is completed. It is proposed therefore to retain the original employment and local centre allocations in this Local Plan and remain committed to the original Berryfields concept.


View Comments (5) D-AGT5: Berryfields

Site Ref:

AGT5

Site Name:

Berryfields

Size (hectares)

Total site area: 195ha

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

9ha of employment and a district centre

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site. In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. employment allocation of 9ha split on two sites with a range of employment uses and space for start-up units in high quality buildings. The proposed development will add variety to the portfolio of employment in Aylesbury
  2. the district centre includes the secondary school, combined school, recreational facilities, shopping, key services and community facilities, some limited employment opportunities and residential development
  3. the district centre is located at the intersection of the principal road, pedestrian and cycle networks, and consideration should be given to design to ensure public transport and sustainable travel choices are maximised
  4. incorporated within the district centre will be a series of related open spaces to contribute to the sense of place and quality of the centre
  5. adequate parking should be provided. Parking should be located close to the Western Link Road.

Implementation Approach

Design proposals for both the employment allocation and district centre should be in line with the Berryfields MDA Development Brief (2004) and design codes and the Aylesbury Garden Town development principles within policy D1 and subsequent supporting Garden Town Supplementary Planning Documents (SPDs).

Kingsbrook, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.89 'Kingsbrook, Aylesbury' is a major urban extension on the eastern side of Aylesbury on 306ha of land between Bierton and the Aylesbury Arm of the Grand Union Canal.

No Comments 4.90 Outline planning permission was granted in December 2013 for 2,450 homes, 10ha employment land, a neighbourhood centre, two primary schools, construction of the Eastern Link Road (northern part) and the Stocklake Link Road (rural section), green infrastructure including a major wetland park, associated community facilities and support infrastructure including an expanded electricity substation and flood defences.  Land to the north of the development is also reserved as a site for a new secondary school should it be required as Aylesbury grows.

No Comments 4.91 The housing development is based on the principle of creating three villages within the overall framework of the site.  Reserved matters have been approved for two of the three villages, Oakfield Village and Orchard Green, comprising 1,353 dwellings of which some 300 are complete or under construction.  Key elements of transport infrastructure including the Eastern Link Road and Stocklake Link are also well under way.

No Comments 4.92 The site is located immediately to the east of Aylesbury.  It extends from Oakfield Road in  the west and to the south runs to the Grand Union Canal with a small area of the site extending to the other site of the canal towards Broughton. To the east is Aylesbury Golf Centre (driving range) as well as open countryside/agricultural fields. To the north lies the village of Bierton with the application site joining the A418 to the north-east. There is an existing substation towards the centre of the site which is excluded from the red edge but a series of overhead power cables that are within the site. The land prior to development was almost entirely in arable cultivation. Ground levels on-site vary from approximately 87m above ordnance datum (AOD) to 78m AOD.

No Comments 4.93 Account should be taken of potential landscape visual impact from the Chilterns AONB; Ellesborough-Ivinghoe-Mentmore and Weedon were investigated in the process of considering the planning application.

No Comments 4.94 There are settlements with different identities and settings to be reinforced – Bierton, Broughton, Hulcott and the edge of Aylesbury.

No Comments 4.95 Significant remodelling of the flood zones on the site took place with mitigation measures as part of the outline planning application. The majority of the site is drained via Broughton Brook, an EA designated 'main river' watercourse which is a tributary of Stocklake Brook. The Stocklake Brook watercourse drains the northern catchment area of the site as well as the Broughton Brook catchment. The area immediately to the south of the Grand Union Canal (GUC) is part of the Aylesbury Flood Alleviation Scheme (AFAS) and drains into Bear Brook, which runs south of the site adjacent to the southern side of the GUC.

No Comments 4.96 The site has numerous flora and fauna and a comprehensive scheme of ecological enhancements was required as part of the planning permission. 

View Comments (1) 4.97 The only visible heritage assets within the site are the hedges, routeways, the faint traces of ridge and furrow in some fields and the canal and associated bridges. The majority of hedges and historic routeways across the site would be retained within the development. The Grand Union Canal runs to the south of the main areas of development and has a number of listed and non-listed bridges along this stretch.

No Comments 4.98 As with the Berryfields site allocation, there is relatively little development left to require a formal policy allocation. However, with the design code, reserved matters for the remaining 'village' at Kingsbrook and the employment site yet to be submitted, the need to reserve the land for education, playing fields and allotments, an allocation in this plan will ensure that when that development comes forward, it does so in accordance with the outline planning permission and the policies in place at that time recognising Aylesbury's Garden Town status.

No Comments 4.99 Outline planning permission (10/02649/AOP) was granted in December 2013. Two villages have since had approved reserve matters.  The site is being delivered according to the following phasing:

Phase 1: Years one to seven: the first phase of development would see the commencement of construction of approximately 770 residential units within the western village. Access to phase 1 will primarily be achieved through delivery of the initial section of the Stockdale Link Road, from its junction with Douglas Road and Oakfield Road. The first phase will see construction of the Stockdale Link Road to the east, beyond its junction with Broughton Lane, thus the proposed junction arrangements for Broughton Lane and Burcott Lane are also to be delivered in phase 1. Also in Phase 1 the remainder of the Stocklake Link Road and the northern section of the Eastern Link Road, from its junction with the A418 to the Stocklake Link Road, will be constructed.

Phase 2: Years two to 10: the second phase of development would provide an additional 780 dwellings, the first primary school and, should it be required, the secondary school site.

Phase 3: Years five to 16: the final broad phase would deliver the final 900 residential units, the second primary school and the 10ha of employment land.

No Comments 4.100 The concept plan sets out the key components for the site: the strategic road links within the site are included, along with the location of the key land use elements of the site particularly employment, housing, schools, flood mitigation, the wetland park and the green infrastructure.

No Comments 4.101 The vision and objectives of the site are outlined below:

  • The delivery of a well-designed, connected, safe and integrated urban extension to Aylesbury that will deliver essential market and affordable homes, jobs, community facilities and infrastructure of town- and county-wide significance whilst protecting and enhancing environmental assets. The delivery of infrastructure of town and county-wide importance underpins this vision, namely:
    1. Construction of a substantial part of the Aylesbury Eastern Link Road, the complete construction of the rural section of the Stocklake Link Road and with contributions to secure the complete length of the Eastern Link Road (i.e. land from the Barratt-funded section adjacent to the Grand Union Canal to the A41 (Aston Clinton Road Major Development Area)
    2. Traffic calming scheme to the village of Bierton to improve road safety and the quality of life for the existing residents
    3. Improvements to the Aylesbury Town Centre flood alleviation scheme
    4. Green infrastructure comprising 67% of the gross site area. The hierarchy and integrated network of green spaces will incorporate recreation and sports facilities, public open space, play areas, allotments and orchards, sustainable drainage, nature reserves and ecological enhancement areas, and education/interpretation facilities as well as attractive pedestrian and cycle routes to the town centre
    5. New education facilities, including a new site for a new secondary school and two new primary schools.

View Comments (8) D-AGT6: Kingsbrook

Site Ref:

AGT6

Site Name:

Kingsbrook

Size (hectares)

306.6ha

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

  • 2,450 homes
  • 10ha employment
  • Two primary schools
  • A neighbourhood centre
  • Construction of the northern section of the Eastern Link Road and the rural section of the Stocklake Link road
  • Green Infrastructure
  • A major wetland park
  • Flood alleviation scheme/sustainable drainage
  • Community facilities
  • Play areas
  • Land for a secondary school, sports pitches and allotments
  • Town-wide flood defences
  • Health facilities
  • Public art
  • Improvements to the canal towpath

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site.  In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. Provision for land for around 2,450 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. Provision of land, building and car parking for two primary schools and land for a secondary school
  3. Existing vegetation should be retained where practicable, including existing woodlands and hedgerows. Existing public rights of way need to be retained and integrated into the development within safe and secure environments as part of a wider network of sustainable routes, to directly and appropriately link the site with surrounding communities and facilities
  4. Proposals must retain and enhance existing habitats where practicable, including the creation of linkages with surrounding wildlife assets. A new wetland park should be provided
  5. The development should be designed using a landscape-led approach including consideration of the long-distance views of the AONB
  6. Provision for public transport into the town and to surrounding areas
  7. A flood alleviation system benefitting the wider community and provision of sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) will be required to reduce pressure on the existing drainage network
  8. Provision and management of 50% green infrastructure to link to other new development areas and the wider countryside
  9. Provision of on-site health facilities and community buildings (including temporary buildings if necessary)
  10. Provision of and contribution to infrastructure as appropriate.

Implementation Approach

Two villages already have reserved matters approved planning applications. Construction is already under way to develop the site in accordance with the planning permissions, the approved development brief and principles within Policy D1 and any subsequent supporting Garden Town.

A concept masterplan/SPD for the third village should be prepared and adopted to inform the submission of a design code and reserve matters for that village. Design should take account of the over-arching Garden Town principles (policy D1) and details within the Garden Town Design SPD to ensure comprehensive development. The SPD should demonstrate how the village links to and contributes to the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town as a whole.

Ardenham Lane, Aylesbury

View Comments (1) 4.102 The site is located approximately 400m north of Aylesbury town centre adjacent to the Royal Bucks Hospital. It is bounded by Ardenham Lane to the west, Oxford Road to the south, Bicester Road to the north and east. Immediately adjacent to the site are three roundabouts that provide access into the town centre from Oxford Road (A418), Bicester Road (A41) and Buckingham Road (A413).  The site therefore is in a prominent location and should be designed with this in mind. The site comprises a number of uses including the Job centre+ located at Sunley House and other employment uses located at Ashton Court.

View Comments (2) D-AYL032  Ardenham Lane, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL032

Size (hectares)

2ha

Allocated for

70 dwellings

Source

Change of use (COU) – prior approval not required in respect of transport and highway impact, contamination risk and flooding for the proposed change of use of a building from office to residential use comprising the creation of four one-bed flats, three studios and two one-bed houses (nine dwellings in total).

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 1-15 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for approximately 70 flats based on Sunley House and  although much of the site could be developed though permitted development rights and/or prior approval the densities should take account of the adjacent settlement character. The site should make provisions for a comprehensive scheme including those elements of the site that are currently being marketed.  Sunley House is currently occupied by the Job Centre + on the ground floor and office accommodation above. This office building could be converted into residential under prior approval/change of use and could yield  approximately 40 flats. Ashton Court could also be converted into residential under Prior Approval/Change of Use and could yield approximately 16 flats
  2. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  3. The site allocation should be accessed via Ardenham Lane and be accompanied by a design and access statement. This will need to identify both service and refuse vehicle access to the site
  4. Any proposal will be designed in a way that conserves heritage assets therefore, only part of the site fronting Oxford Road is suitable for development to avoid adverse impacts to heritage assets
  5. Due to the importance of open space in flatted developments, a contribution towards the provision of open space and sports and recreational facilities in accordance with the Open Space, Sports needs assessment 2017 will be required
  6. An assessment of sewerage capacity and/or water supply will be required in consultation with Thames Water.

Land at Thame Road, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.103 The site is located to the south of the railway line and Aylesbury Station. It is bounded by Thames Road to the south, California Brook and a footpath to the east, playing field to the west and the Aylesbury College to the north. The site comprises underutilised land and is well screened from Thame Road by tall hedgerows.

View Comments (3) D-AYL073 Land at Thame Road/Leach Road, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL073

Size (hectares)

0.6ha

Allocated for

18 dwellings

Source

Call for sites

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 1-5 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for  around 18 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character
  2. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  3. The site allocation should be accessed via Thame Road and be accompanied by a design and access statement
  4. A transport assessment will be required to assess the developments impact on the highway and, where necessary, public transportation network
  5. Provide a footway and potentially a widened Thame Road (the access to the site) would need sufficient off-street parking so that parking was not encouraged on-street. Parking restrictions down Leach Road may have to be introduced as it is narrow due to displaced parking
  6. An arboricultural and ecological survey will be required to survey the age, health and potential growth of a tree/trees in the designated area as well as wildlife habitat potential to inform the development.
  7. The existing trees and hedgerows should be retained to maximise wildlife habitat potential and biodiversity net gain
  8. There is an identified water supply constraint which is likely to require an infrastructure upgrade by Thames Water to serve the level of growth on the site. An assessment of sewerage capacity will be required in consultation with Thames Water
  9. SFRA Level 2 - a site-specific flood risk assessment and surface water drainage strategy is required. Detailed modelling is required to confirm the extent of flood zones and climate change extents with climate change modelling undertaken using the relevant allowances for the type of development and level of risk. Residual risk to the site should be investigated. Development proposals must comply with the SFRA Level 2 'Guidance for site design and making development safe' criteria.

PO Sorting Office, Cambridge Street, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.104 The site is located adjacent to the town centre and is bounded by the Upper Hundreds Way dual carriageway to the south, Cambridge Street to the west, housing to the north and car parking and a B&Q superstore to the east. The site comprises of a large two-storey 1960s office block that houses the Royal Mail and its associated car parking. The site also comprises a larger car park with a single unit site that is ancillary to the main Royal Mail building.

View Comments (1) D-AYL052 PO Sorting Office, Cambridge Street, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL052

Size (hectares)

0.92ha

Allocated for

23 dwellings

5,000 sqm comparison retail

Source

HELAA – Suitable/Development Brief

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 6-15 years of VALP adoption.

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for around 23 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character.
  2. Any proposals will need to reflect the adjacent building heights and be appropriate in scale. All building should reflect a contemporary design to accord with the local distinctiveness
  3. The development shall be based on a design brief to be prepared for the site which will need to reflect the local distinctiveness of its specific locality within the district. The design brief will need to ensure that the proposed development meets the required design principles based on recognised good practice
  4. The development will  need to provide for a mixed use scheme consisting primarily of retail with an element of residential
  5. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  6. The site allocation should be accessed via Upper Hundreds Way and be accompanied by a design and access statement
  7. The Upper Hundreds Way roundabout will need to be modified to include a fourth arm to provide sufficient access to the site. The scheme design will need to be agreed by the highways authority and constructed at pre-commencement stages
  8. A transport statement will be required to assess the development's impact on the highway and, where necessary, public transportation network
  9. Any proposals on this site should provide for an alternative 'at-grade' crossing adjacent to the existing subway between Britannia Street and Cambridge Street to provide a secondary access. This will allow possible redevelopment of the land to the north-west of the Wilkinson's store on the adjacent side of Cambridge Street.
  10. The existing pedestrian crossing to the north of Hampden House should be relocated  to the north-west to be directly opposite Railway Street.
  11. Water supply constraint likely to require infrastructure upgrade by Thames Water to serve the level of growth on the site. An assessment of sewerage capacity  will be required in consultation with Thames Water
  12. The site has had previous activity that may suffer from contamination.  The Council will expect an investigation to be undertaken and, if necessary, the submission of decontamination proposals with any planning application.

Land at junction of Buckingham Street and New Street, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.105 The site is located approximately 400m north of Aylesbury town centre adjacent to the Royal Bucks Hospital. It is bounded by Buckingham Street to the south, New Street to the north and Fairfax House (VAHT) to the east. Immediately adjacent to the site are three roundabouts that provide access into the town centre from Oxford Road (A418), Bicester Road (A41) and Buckingham Road (A413), the site therefore is in a prominent location and should be designed with this in mind. The residential block of flats on the Oxford Road and Buckingham Street should be considered as a reference point for any proposal. The site comprises four shops with A3 uses, one being vacant that face Buckingham Street with parking and service yards at the rear.

View Comments (2) D-AYL059 Land at junction of Buckingham Street and New Street, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL059

Size (hectares)

0.11ha

Allocated for

14 dwellings

Source

HELAA - Suitable

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 6-15 years of VALP adoption. The site has multiple occupants

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for around 14 dwellings  notwithstanding any permitted development rights, at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character including the listed buildings nearby including Royal Buckinghamshire Hospital and Ardenham House. The western section of the site is the only part suitable for redevelopment. Fairfax House is not being allocated for housing as it is currently well occupied, housing the Vale of Aylesbury Housing Trust (VAHT).  This is a prominent entrance to the town and any proposal should be designed to accord with the design SPD and express an exemplary design
  2. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  3. The proximity of the site in the town centre means it can afford flexibility over existing parking standards and therefore any scheme  on this site should be car free. The scheme would need to be supported by a design and access statement to demonstrate how well the site will provide for servicing and delivery arrangements
  4. A parking survey would need to be provided to ensure there would not be displaced parking
  5. The existing trees and hedgerows [and/or anything else] should be retained
  6. A heritage statement will need to be submitted as part of any planning application in order to fully assess the impact of the proposed development on the listed building and its setting
  7. An assessment of sewerage capacity and/or water supply will be required in consultation with Thames Water
  8. A sufficient surface water management plan to be provided.

Oaklands Hostel, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.106 The site is located off Bicester Road approximately 400m north-east of the town centre. The site is bounded by Bicester Road to the north, residential to the east, Stocklake Park School to the south and The Weavers public house to the west. The site is vacant and was formerly a day centre.

View Comments (1) D-AYL077 Oaklands Hostel, 3 Bierton Rd, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL077

Size (hectares)

0.44ha

Allocated for

13 dwellings

Source

HELAA suitable

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 1-5 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for around 13 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character
  2. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  3. The site allocation should be accessed via Bicester Road and be accompanied by a design and access statement
  4. Any scheme on this site should retain parking facilities and adhere to local parking standards
  5. An identified water supply constraint is likely to require an infrastructure upgrade by Thames Water to serve the level of growth on the site. An assessment of sewerage capacity  will be required in consultation with Thames Water

Hampden House, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.107 Hampden House is located in a prominent position on the edge of the town centre commanding a corner bounded by the A418 and two roundabouts, therefore any proposed development should be designed with this in mind. The A418 and A41 act as the inner ring road in this location. The High Street defines the site's southern boundary and Railway Street the western boundary and main access. The site comprises a 1960s four-storey office building with the QD department store on the ground floor and undercroft car parking.

View Comments (2) D-AYL063 Hampden House, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL063

Size (hectares)

0.46ha

Allocated for

112 dwellings

Source

Application for conversion from B1 offices to 112 flats was withdrawn 14/02032/COUOR

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 1-5 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will comply with a development brief that will steer proposals to  make provision for around 112 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character. The site should also retain its retail (A1) provision on the ground floor
  2. The development shall be based on a design brief to be prepared for the site which will need to reflect the local distinctiveness of its specific locality on this important edge-of-town centre site. The design brief will need to ensure that the proposed development meets the required design principles based on recognised good practice
  3. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  4. The site allocation should be accessed via Railway Street and be accompanied by a design and access statement which will need to demonstrate impact of proposal in relation to parking on the existing town centre provisions
  5. Car parking will need to be retained to accommodate both residential and retail elements of any proposed development
  6. Opportunities to incorporate a green roof should be explored as part of a sustainable drainage systems (SuDS) strategy
  7. An assessment of sewerage capacity  will be required in consultation with Thames Water.

Land north of Manor Hospital, Aylesbury

No Comments 4.108 The site lies adjacent to a site that has consent for 50 residential units and forms the eastern side of a previous outline planning application for 83 residential units. It is bounded by Bierton Road to the north, the consented application site for 50 to the west, HMP Aylesbury to the east and The Whiteleaf Centre to the south. The site encompasses the NHS Sue Nicholls Centre with associated car parking and scrub land.

View Comments (2) D-AYL068 Land north of Manor Hospital, Bierton Rd, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL068

Size (hectares)

1.7ha

Allocated for

39 dwellings

Source

16/02851/ADP – Granted - Approval of reserved matters of pursuant to outline permission 14/02689/AOP relating to appearance, layout and scale for the demolition of the existing housing at 1-6 Manor House Close (6 dwellings) and the construction of 50 (net 44) new dwellings together with associated amenity space, car parking, landscaping and the upgrading of the existing access point on to Bierton Road.

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 6-15 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for 39 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character.  Part of the site should be retained for hospital services.
  2. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  3. The site allocation should be accessed via Bierton Road and be accompanied by a design and access statement
  4. Any scheme would need to retain car parking and promote cycle route opportunities to the town centre
  5. The Old Manor House wall fronting Bierton Road should be retained to preserve local distinctiveness and provide visual enclosure
  6. An identified water supply constraint is likely to require an infrastructure upgrade by Thames Water to serve the level of growth on the site. An assessment of sewerage capacity will be required in consultation with Thames Water.

Rabans Lane, Aylesbury

View Comments (1) 4.109 The site comprises a factory and ancillary office building on the edge of an industrial area of western Aylesbury and adjacent to the railway line between Aylesbury and Aylesbury Vale Parkway and bounded by woodland. Land on the opposite site of the railway line has been developed since the late 1970s for suburban housing. The site is in close proximity to the A41 Bicester Road, the employment areas of Rabans Lane Industrial Area and Broadfields Retail Park and Fairford Leys housing area.

View Comments (4) D-AYL115 Rabans Lane, Aylesbury

Site reference

AYL115

Size (hectares)

6.6ha

Allocated for

200 dwellings

Source

HELAA suitable

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 1-5 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for around 200 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent residential character north of the railway line.
  2. This site falls within the Aylesbury Garden Town designation and as such any proposals will need to accord with the design and delivery principles identified in Policy D1 Delivering Aylesbury Garden Town
  3. The site should be accessed via Rabans Lane with the provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages to the existing gemstone routes through the site; alternative access options to be explored are Rabans Lane and Rabans Close
  4. The development must provide any transport improvements required including the provision of a footpath along the length of Rabans Lane
  5. A transport assessment will be required to assess the development's impact on the highway and where necessary public transportation network
  6. Surface water modelling should be undertaken to define the level of surface water and the risk areas/flow paths. Climate change should be modelled using the +-40%  allowance for rainfall intensity. A surface water drainage strategy should ensure that the development does not increase flood risk elsewhere.
  7. An identified water supply constraint is likely to require infrastructure upgrade by Thames Water to serve the level of growth on the site. An assessment of sewerage capacity  will be required in consultation with Thames Water
  8. Retain buffer of vegetation including enhancement of the deciduous woodland which is a priority habitat next to railway and to the adjacent TW site as well as providing a buffer between the adjoining employment areas and housing provision.

Salden Chase

View Comments (1) 4.110 In determining the housing figure for Aylesbury Vale, a crucial aspect of the Local Plan is to decide the strategic locations where development should be allocated. At the issues and options stages of the Local Plan two strategic allocations were considered on the edge of Milton Keynes/Bletchley.

View Comments (2) 4.111 The Housing and Economic Land Availability Assessment (HELAA) v4 (January 2017) confirmed that the two strategic allocations known as Salden Chase (NLV001) and Shenley Park (WHA001) were both suitable or part suitable for housing and or economic development.

View Comments (3) 4.112 As a result of further assessment and taking account of the overall housing requirement for Aylesbury Vale, Salden Chase has been identified as the most appropriate strategic allocation to come forward at this stage.

View Comments (1) 4.113 The site currently comprises agricultural land. There are hedgerows and trees at some of the field boundaries. There are agricultural buildings on the site. There are adjoining buildings that are in residential use.

View Comments (1) 4.114 An oil pipeline crosses the middle of the site in a north-south direction; a 10m wide exclusion zone for the pipeline is incorporated into the layout of the proposed development. There are high voltage overhead power lines crossing the north-western part of the site; the power lines will be placed underground as part of the proposed development. An intermediate pressure gas main passes through the eastern part of the site in a north south direction; the gas main will fall within land set aside for the grid road reserve.

View Comments (1) 4.115 The site is crossed by an existing public right of way in the form of a bridleway.

View Comments (1) 4.116 The topography of the site includes a ridge towards the centre of the site with a gradual slope descending  towards Newton Longville.

View Comments (1) 4.117 There is a resolution to approve an outline planning application for the site – 15/00314/AOP –  with all matters reserved except for access for a mixed-use sustainable urban extension on land to the south west of Milton Keynes to provide up to 1,855 mixed tenure dwellings; an employment area (B1); a neighbourhood centre including retail (A1/A2/A3/A4/A5), community (D1/D2) and residential (C3) uses; a primary and a secondary school; a grid road reserve; multi-functional green space; a sustainable drainage system; and associated access, drainage and public transport infrastructure.

View Comments (2) 4.118 A masterplan supplementary planning document (SPD) for the site will establish the site layout and disposition of land uses. The development will adhere to the following place shaping principles:

  • provide a long term defensible boundary to the western edge of Milton Keynes recognise that, whilst being located totally within Aylesbury Vale, the development will use some facilities in Milton Keynes, given its proximity. Milton Keynes also provides access point into the site
  • ensure the long term retention of Newton Longville and Whaddon as separate communities with unique identities, and protect them and other neighbouring communities, (including Mursley and Far Bletchley), from direct and indirect negative impacts generated by the development
  • be deliverable so as to maximise speed of delivery, enable faster delivery of key infrastructure whilst minimising disruption and delay
  • provide a sustainable and strategic approach to flood mitigation and urban drainage, linked to multi-functional green infrastructure, to control surface water flows and flooding, (as set out in the Milton Keynes Strategic Flood Risk Assessment and Water Cycle Study)
  • ensure green infrastructure and green open space is provided in the form of a liner park to the south of the site to minimise impacts to Howe Park Wood site of special scientific interest (SSSI) and that there are adequate green links to neighbouring Tattenhoe Park
  • infrastructure will need to be provided and phased alongside development, the details of which will be agreed through developer contribution agreements.

View Comments (1) 4.119 The vision and objectives for this site are:

  • To create an exemplar development, of regional significance, which will be a great place to live, work and grow. Built to a high sustainable design and construction standards, the development will provide a balanced mix of facilities to ensure that it meets the needs and aspirations of new and existing residents
  • To create a sustainable community providing a mix of uses to ensure that housing development is accompanied by employment, infrastructure services and facilities
  • To ensure that high quality walking, cycling and public transport links to and from Newton Longville, Bletchley and the city of Milton Keynes are an integral part of the development
  • To take account of the delivery of EWR instead and not compromising – safeguarding against noise etc.
  • To ensure that infrastructure, facilities and services are delivered in the right place at the right time, for example, provision of new education facilities, and well planned and laid out local centres to establish the heart of new communities.
  • To ensure that the deciduous woodland priority habitat the north of the site is retained and that green infrastructure is an integral part of the design
  • To ensure that strong place shaping, community safety and sustainability principles are embedded throughout, creating a socially diverse place with a mix of dwelling types and tenure mix including at least 30% affordable housing  'pepper-potted' throughout the site, and
  • To be designed in a way to ensure that the new development relates to the wider site context including the relationship with Milton Keynes and Newton Longville and other surrounding villages.

View Comments (17) D-NLV001 Salden Chase

Site Ref:

NLV001

Site Name:

Salden Chase, Whaddon Road, Newton Longville

Size (hectares)

143.9ha

Phasing

100 homes to be delivered 2017-2022 and 1,755 homes to be delivered from 2023-2033

Allocated for (key development and land use requirements)

Resolution to approve - 15/00314/AOP – Outline planning application with all matters reserved except for access for a mixed-use sustainable urban extension on land to the south west of Milton Keynes to provide up to 1,855 mixed tenure dwellings; an employment area (B1); a neighbourhood centre including retail (A1/A2/A3/A4/A5), community (D1/D2) and residential (C3) uses; a primary and a secondary school; a grid road reserve; multi-functional green space; a sustainable drainage system; and associated access, drainage and public transport infrastructure.

Access into the site is a matter for consideration in this application and as submitted, there are three points of access proposed from the development onto the local highway network at the following locations: Whaddon Road, Buckingham Road and A421 Standing Way. Of these three access/egress points serving the site, Buckingham Road and A421 Standing Way are both within the control of Milton Keynes Council and Whaddon Road is within the control of Aylesbury Vale District Council.

Highway Improvements by Condition(s)

  • Buckingham Road Access signalised gyratory including Stage 1 Road Safety Audit
  • Whaddon Road Access speed limit reduction and further detailed design 

Highway Improvements by s106 agreement(s)

  • A421 Standing Way left in only junction and further detailed design
  • Signalisation of the priority junctions of the A421/ Warren Road and

A421/Shucklow Hill/Little Horwood Road.

  • In order to mitigate the potential impact in Whaddon a financial contribution is required towards road safety improvements on Coddimoor Lane and Stock Lane
  • Newton Longville Traffic Calming Proposals. Currently this is an indicative scheme which may include enhanced gateway features on all roads leading into the village and raised junction tables and signing/lining

Internal Road Layout

  • A new network of primary streets will form the principal circulation route for all vehicular traffic including a bus route. The route will connect with the existing highway network at the three access points. Plans should show that the primary street is to be at least 7.3m wide, with a footway/cycleway of 3m wide and will need to consider drop off provision, widened footways, crossing points, road signage and lining to provide for a serviced school site

Grid Road

  • Whilst the site only requires a single carriageway road for access, a dual carriageway could be provided in the future. The land for the grid road will need to be adequately secured in the S106 Agreement for the future extension of Snelshall Street (V1) so that AVDC/BCC can develop and implement a scheme in the future

Public Transport Provision

  • The enhancement of the existing bus service or provision of a new service to operate between the proposed development and Central Milton Keynes (CMK) via the existing rail station will be required and  included within the Framework Travel Plan.

Public rights of way

  • A number of improvements to the surfacing of the local footpaths will be required within the site and be completed as part of the development and a financial contribution is to be secured as part of the Section 106 Agreement for those routes outside of the site. The improvements within the site include:
    • ensure a  Redway compliant Grid Road reserve to link with existing PROW
    • upgrade of footpath  and resurface between Weasel Lane and the railway underpass; route to be dedicated as a public bridleway
    • resurface byway  in  Newton Longville Parish and in  Mursley Parish between  Dagnall House Buckingham Road to the adopted highway
Site-specific Requirements

Conserving and enhancing the natural environment

In terms of the impact on the landscape, site proposals should use land efficiently and create a well-defined boundary between the settlement and countryside.

Landscape

Site proposals will be required to respect and complement the physical characteristics of the site and its surroundings, the building tradition of the locality, and the scale and context of the setting, the natural qualities and features of the area and the effect of the development on important public views and skylines.

Air Quality

An air quality assessment will be required and its content and conclusions accepted prior to construction phases.

Noise Contamination

An Environmental Management plan will be required  via a condition and with detailed consideration of the layout at reserved matters stage.

A condition can be attached in case any contamination is found.

Conservation

The significance of any heritage assets affected including any contribution made by their setting will need to be considered. When considering the impact on the significance, great weight should be given to the asset's conservation. 

The protection and enhancement of sites of archaeological importance needs to be considered.

Ecology Biodiversity

Proposals will need to quantify ecological impacts in a meaningful way to enable pre and post development comparison, sufficient to objectively assess net losses or gains and to provide for multifunctional habitats. Proposals will need to minimise the impact on Howe Park Wood SSSI.

Trees and hedgerows

An aboricultrural survey has been undertaken for the site and has identified that trees of A and B category are to be retained and incorporated into any development. New structural and screen tree planting, hedge and shrub planting will be required as part of the future detailed scheme.

Place-Making Framework

The site will comprise residential development; employment area;

neighbourhood centre; land for a three form entry primary school with early years provision and four form entry secondary school; green infrastructure and associated drainage, highway and transport infrastructure and the proposed distribution of uses across the site are set in the parameters plan.

Community facilities and Green Infrastructure

The site will need to make provision for a comprehensive network of multifunctional open spaces and green corridors with both formal and areas of informal public open space.  This will include 53.67ha of green open space and 1.18ha of allotment land, nine locally equipped areas of play (LEAPs) and also two neighbourhood equipped areas of play, which each include a multi

use games area. In addition to the provision of LEAPs and NEAPs on site, youth shelter, a multi-use games area (MUGA), sports hall, changing pavilion, skateboard park, sports pitches, cricket wicket, tennis courts and a community centre will be required through a S106 Agreement. Multi functional Green Infrastructure will be required to control surface water flows and flooding.

Education

The site will need to makes provision for a three-form entry primary school, with early years pre-school facilities on 3ha of land and a secondary school on 5.2ha of land. Provision is also made for accessible recreation and community uses to serve the new residents, designed and located with the intention to be complementary to the delivery of the new schools.

Health Facilities

A contribution towards or delivery of a healthcare facilities either by way of site provision in an accessible location or direct funding to provide for a minimum 4GP with reserve to 6GP surgery will be required at reserved matters or detail stages.

Local Centre

The site will need to make provision for a neighbourhood centre on 0.67ha of land to include retail (A1/A2/A3/A5 and A5) and community facilities (D1 and D2).

Employment Area

The site will need to make provision for an employment area (B1) on 2.07ha of land.

Implementation Approach

An updated illustrated masterplan has been submitted in support of the planning application. The masterplan aims to encourage walking and cycling as realistic alternatives to that of the private car, through high quality infrastructure. The masterplan identifies 'alternative' Redway routes through the site which is considered a positive benefit and will need to be developed further as part of any future reserved matter applications.

The details of the cycle and pedestrian infrastructure within the site will need to form and be considered as part of any future reserved matters application.

No Comments Concept Plan



Delivering growth at strategic settlements, larger and medium villages

Role of the Housing and Economic Development Land Availability Assessment (HELAA)

View Comments (4) 4.120 The allocations in the Local Plan are based on the Council's HELAA.  This is a strategic assessment of the availability and suitability of land for development, providing a key component of the evidence base to inform the Local Plan. It establishes realistic assumptions about the number of homes and amount of economic development that sites could yield and the timeframe within which this might come forward. The HELAA is an important evidence source to inform plan-making, but does not in itself determine whether a site should be allocated for housing or economic development or whether planning permission should be granted. The allocation of a site for development can only be made in the Local Plan or through a neighbourhood plan.

No Comments 4.121 As set out in the spatial strategy (S2), sites are allocated based on the capacity of a settlement to accommodate development, taking into account factors such as landscape, flooding and settlement form as well as site availability.  Site-specific allocations for strategic settlements (other than Aylesbury), larger and medium villages are set out in the following sections.

View Comments (2) 4.122 Sites not allocated in this Plan or in a made Neighbourhood Plan will not normally be permitted, as the district's required level of growth is to be met in full by these allocations.  The only exceptions to this are where the Council's monitoring of delivery across the district shows that the allocated sites are not being delivered at the expected rate, or where the proposals are for small-scale areas of land in accordance with Policy D2.  Proposals will need to be accompanied by evidence demonstrating how the site can be delivered in a timely manner and meet all of the criteria in the Policy below.

View Comments (47) D2 Proposals for non-allocated sites at strategic settlements, larger villages and medium villages

Development in strategic settlements, larger and medium villages that are not allocated in this plan or in a made neighbourhood plan will be restricted to small scale areas of land within the built-up areas of settlements.  Subject to other policies in the Plan, permission will be granted for development comprising:

  1. infilling of small gaps in developed frontages in keeping with the scale and spacing of nearby dwellings and the character of the surroundings, or
  2. development that consolidates existing settlement patterns without harming important settlement characteristics, and does not comprise partial development of a larger site

Further development beyond allocated sites and small-scale development as set out in criteria a) or b) above will only be permitted where the Council's monitoring of housing delivery across the district shows that the allocated sites are not being delivered at the anticipated rate.  Proposals will need to be accompanied by evidence demonstrating how the site can be delivered in a timely manner.  The proposal must contribute to the sustainability of that settlement, be in accordance with all applicable policies in the Plan, and fulfil all of the following criteria:

  1. be located within or adjacent to the existing developed footprint of the settlement * or, where there is a made neighbourhood plan which includes a settlement boundary, the site is located entirely within that settlement boundary
  2. not lead to coalescence with any neighbouring settlement
  3. be of a scale and in a location that is in keeping with the existing form of the settlement, and not adversely affect its character and appearance
  4. respect and retain natural boundaries and features such as trees, hedgerows, embankments and drainage ditches
  5. not have any adverse impact on environmental assets such as landscape, historic environment, biodiversity, waterways, open space and green infrastructure, and
  6. provide appropriate infrastructure provision such as waste water drainage and highways.

*The existing developed footprint is defined as the continuous built form of the village, and excludes individual buildings and groups of dispersed buildings. This includes former agricultural barns that have been converted, agricultural buildings and associated land on the edge of the village and gardens, paddocks and other undeveloped land within the curtilage of buildings on the edge of the settlement where the land relates more to the surrounding countryside than to the built-up area of the village.

Delivering the allocated sites – at strategic settlements

View Comments (2) 4.123 This section deals with the strategic settlements of Buckingham, Haddenham, Winslow and Wendover (Aylesbury is covered in the previous sub-section and is considered to be a sub-regional strategic settlement).  The strategic settlements are the most sustainable towns and villages in the district as they have the highest provision of services and facilities and are therefore the focus for the majority of the rest of the district's development.  As set out in Policies S2 and S3, the strategic settlements (excluding Aylesbury) will provide a total of 5,730 new homes between 2013 and 2033. Those sites that already have planning permission (as at 2016/17) and homes already built in the period 2013-2017 are included in the total to be provided.

View Comments (4) 4.124 Buckingham, Haddenham and Winslow all have neighbourhood plans which have had a high level of community support, albeit the housing policies in the Haddenham neighbourhood plan have since been quashed.  This Plan aims to reflect the need for housing delivery in the most sustainable locations whilst not undermining the aims of the neighbourhood plans, taking the quashed allocations, where possible, in the Haddenham neighbourhood plan as the community's preference for the location of development.  This Plan allocates the reserve sites at Buckingham and Haddenham, and just one site beyond the neighbourhood plan's expectations/allocations, at Haddenham and Winslow, specifically north of Rosemary Lane at Haddenham (315 homes) and east of the B4033 at Winslow (585), and allocates two further sites at Buckingham, reflecting it being the second most sustainable settlement in the district, specifically Moreton Road at Buckingham (130 homes) and land off Osier Way, south of A421 and east of Gawcott Road (420 homes).

View Comments (21) 4.125 In terms of Wendover, approximately 1,000 homes will come forward during the Plan period at RAF Halton Camp after its closure in 2022.  This is considered to be a realistic and somewhat conservative estimate, and the figure could increase as detailed masterplanning is developed.

Buckingham

View Comments (7) 4.126 Buckingham is a small market town located in the north of Buckinghamshire approximately 17 miles north-west of Aylesbury, 11 miles from Bicester and 12 miles south-west of Milton Keynes. Buckingham supports a population of approximately 12,000. The historic core of Buckingham is situated on raised ground and is largely contained within a sweeping bend of the River Great Ouse. The historic core of Buckingham was designated as a conservation area in 1971.  Buckingham is the second largest town and a focal point for housing, employment, administrative and community facilities in northern Aylesbury Vale. The town is home to the University of Buckingham, the UK's first independent university.

View Comments (4) 4.127 Buckingham has a made neighbourhood plan (October 2015).  It provides for 617 homes on new sites, 400 student units and 10 hectares of employment land south of the Wipac site on the A413.

No Comments 4.128 The Water Cycle Study (2017) assessed the impact of growth on water cycle infrastructure in the village. The following policy is to ensure that growth takes place with any upgrades to the treatment works that may be needed.

View Comments (17) D-BUC043 Land west of AVDLP allocation BU1 Moreton Road, Buckingham

Site reference

BUC043

Size (hectares)

14.9ha

Allocated for

130 homes

sports pitches/recreation space and green  infrastructure

Source

HELAA and planning application 14/02601/AOP

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood plan, made in October 2015. The land has no notation but is outside the settlement boundary

Phasing

The site is expected to be delivered between 2018 and 2023

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of  around 130 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA)
  3. An ecological management plan shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Council, covering tree planting, hedge planting, pond creation, provision of 2ha of mitigatory grassland and ongoing management of the site
  4. A tree protection plan is required for approval showing the height and position of protective fencing
  5. A hard and soft landscaping scheme is required to be submitted for approval
  6. Archaeological assessment and evaluation is required to be submitted to the Council
  7. The scheme layout has regard to the findings of an archaeological investigation and preserves in situ any remains of more than local importance
  8. The development must provide a satisfactory vehicular access to be agreed with Buckinghamshire County Council
  9. A surface water drainage strategy will be required for the site, based on sustainable drainage principles and an assessment submitted to the Council for approval
  10. A foul water strategy is required to be submitted to and approved in writing by the Council
  11. An assessment of sewerage capacity and water resources and water supply will be required in consultation with Anglian Water. The water supply is likely to require an infrastructure upgrade by Anglian Water to serve the level of growth on the site. The Buckingham Wastewater Treatment Works needs upgrading and the delivery of the site will need to work with Anglian Water's asset management plan for delivering the needed upgrade. The surface water network capacity for the sewerage system also needs upgrading.


View Comments (9) D-BUC051 West Buckingham, land bound by Brackley Road and the River Great Ouse

Site reference

BUC051

Size (hectares)

20ha

Allocated for

300 homes and green infrastructure, landscape buffer, riverside walk extension and flood alleviation scheme subject to feasibility.

Source

HELAA and neighbourhood plan

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood plan made in October 2015. The land is allocated as a reserve site for around 300 homes

Phasing

100 homes to be delivered 2018-23 and 200 homes from 2024-2033

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 300 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The development shall be based on a design code to be prepared for the site because it is a large strategic site in a sensitive location on the edge of the settlement
  3. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA) to be submitted and agreed by the Council. A landscape mitigation scheme will be required on the southern boundaries of the site that reduces wider landscape and visual impact
  4. The development must provide a satisfactory vehicular access to be agreed with Buckinghamshire County Council. Access should be off Brackley Road and  will require a transport assessment to demonstrate that access and impact are acceptable and achievable by all modes of transport
  5. No housing development shall take place in Flood Zones 2 or 3
  6. An ecological management plan (EMP) shall be submitted to the Council and approved. The fields in the site north of the railway have a high ecological impact and a 20m buffer either side of the railway including existing woodland is required
  7. In the green infrastructure along the southern site boundary adjacent the river, a feasibility study into provision of a riverside walk extension shall be investigated and if feasible, carried out. This would connect the site to the riverside walk extension identified in the Buckingham Neighbourhood Plan Policy CLH5
  8. The feasibility of a flood alleviation scheme to reduce risk to the site and the wider area from the Great Ouse, making use of the areas within the site allocated for green infrastructure, must be considered. Proposals should be agreed with the Council following consultation with the Environment Agency and Buckinghamshire County Council
  9. At the planning application stage, a site-specific flood risk assessment and surface water drainage strategy will be required. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm the 1 in 20, 100 and 1,000 year extents and 1 in 100 year plus climate change extents on the ordinary watercourse through the centre of the site
  10. Any development must have consideration for its impact on the Buckingham and River Ouzel IDB drainage district and be aware of its byelaws. Residual  risk  to the site should be investigated, for example overtopping or breach of Stowe Octagon Lake and Stowe Park Lake and the impact of the blockage of the bridge under the disused railway should be modelled
  11. Other sources of flooding, particularly surface water flow routes, should be considered as part of a site-specific flood risk assessment.  Development proposals must meet the 'Guidance for site design and making development safe' in the SFRA Level 2
  12. A site drainage strategy should consider whether infiltration is feasible under all groundwater conditions .              A site-specific Flood Risk Assessment should carry out site investigations to identify likely groundwater levels and the site should be designed with consideration of potentially high groundwater levels
  13. An assessment of sewerage capacity and water resources and water supply will be required in consultation with Anglian Water. The water supply is likely to require an infrastructure upgrade by Anglian Water to serve the level of growth on the site. The Buckingham Wastewater Treatment Works needs upgrading and the delivery of the site will need to work with Anglian Water's asset management plan for delivering the needed upgrade. The surface water network capacity for the sewerage system also needs upgrading.

View Comments (13) D-BUC046 Land off Osier Way (south of A421 and east of Gawcott Road)

Site reference

BUC046

Size (hectares)

25.8ha

Allocated for

420 homes and green infrastructure, landscape buffer

Source

HELAA

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood plan made in October 2015. The land has no notation but is outside the settlement boundary.

Phasing

100 homes to be delivered 2018-23 and 320 homes from 2024-2033

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 420 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The development shall be based on a design code to be prepared for the site because it is a large strategic site in a sensitive location on the edge of the settlement
  3. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA) to be submitted and agreed by the Council. A landscape mitigation scheme that reduces wider landscape and visual impact will be required on the southern boundaries of the site
  4. The development must provide a satisfactory vehicular access to be agreed with Buckinghamshire County Council. The primary vehicular access should be off Gawcott Road.  A transport assessment will be required to demonstrate access and impact are acceptable and achievable by all modes of transport
  5. An ecological management plan (EMP) shall be submitted to the Council for approval. Wooded areas on the site have a high ecology impact and  these would need to be retained along with the provision of 20m buffer either side of the stream and pond
  6. At the planning application stage, a site-specific flood risk assessment and surface water drainage strategy will be required. Any development must have consideration for its impact on the Buckingham and River Ouzel IDB drainage district and be aware of its byelaws. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm the 1 in 20, 100 and 1,000 year extents and 1 in 100 year plus climate change extents on the ordinary watercourse through the centre of the site. Other sources of flooding, particularly surface water flow routes, should be considered as part of a site-specific flood risk assessment.  Development proposals must meet the 'Guidance for site design and making development safe' in the SFRA Level 2
  7. Drainage designs should 'design for exceedance' and accommodate existing surface water flood routes e.g. from Gawcott Fields.
  8. An assessment of sewerage capacity and water resources and water supply will be required in consultation with Anglian Water. The water supply is likely to require an infrastructure upgrade by Anglian Water to serve the level of growth on the site. The Buckingham Wastewater Treatment Works needs upgrading and the delivery of the site will need to work with Anglian Water's asset management plan for delivering the needed upgrade. The surface water network capacity for the sewerage system also needs upgrading.

Haddenham

View Comments (1) 4.129 Haddenham is a large village in the south-west of the district with a population of 4,502 (2011 Census). It is one of the most sustainable settlements in the district with good transport links, being served by Haddenham and Thame Parkway station which is on the railway line between London and Birmingham, as well as being adjacent to the A418 which links the village to the M40, the A40 and to Aylesbury which is approximately five miles away. Haddenham has a range of shops, public houses and other services, including a range of employment opportunities at Haddenham Business Park. It is also approximately two miles away from Thame which has a wider range of shops and services.  Haddenham was once three hamlets, Church End, Fort End and Towns End, which have over time joined up through newer development. These historic cores remain with 121 listed buildings in the village. These areas are covered by a conservation area designation. Whilst being a large village, Haddenham still retains a rural character with village greens, ponds and other open space.

No Comments 4.130 The Haddenham Neighbourhood Plan was made in September 2015. The housing chapter has since been quashed following a High Court order in March 2016, but the rest of the plan remains as part of the development plan.

View Comments (14) D-HAD007 Land north of Rosemary Lane

Site reference

HAD007

Size (hectares)

10ha

Allocated for

315 homes

Source

HELAA

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood plan made in September 2015. The land has no notation

Phasing

50 homes to be delivered 2017-22 and 265 homes from 2023-2033

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 315 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity, with lower density housing on the boundary with the adjacent countryside to the north-west
  2. The development shall be based on a design code to be prepared for the site because it is a large strategic site in a sensitive location on the edge of the settlement and it will become the first part of Haddenham experienced when approaching from Churchway
  3. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA) to be submitted and agreed by the Council. A landscape mitigation scheme will be required on the north-western boundaries of the site that reduces wider landscape and visual impact
  4. The development will limit built form with no development beyond where the land rises to the north-west of the site, following a similar line of built form to that in the approved scheme on the adjacent airfield site
  5. The existing trees and hedgerows should be retained
  6. Landscape buffer to be provided between the existing dwellings and the new development, and on the new settlement boundary that will be created along the north-western edge of the development to provide a soft edge to the adjacent countryside
  7. The development will be designed in a way that conserves or enhances heritage assets and their settings, in particular the adjoining conservation area and the listed buildings adjacent to the site
  8. The site should be accessed via Churchway with the retention of the existing footpaths and further provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages through the site and into the village including along Churchway, to the train station and with connections with the adjoining approved airfield development if appropriate and possible
  9. The development should be in compliance with the relevant policies set out in the Haddenham Neighbourhood Plan.

RAF Halton, near Wendover

View Comments (9) 4.131 Wendover is situated on the northern edge of the Chilterns AONB and is one of the most sustainable settlements in the district due to the good provision of services and facilities. RAF Halton is located in the parish of Halton, which adjoins Wendover. The Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO) has confirmed that RAF Halton is to close in 2022 and because it is in reasonable walking and cycling distance of Wendover's services and facilities, it is appropriate that it be redeveloped for housing and other associated uses. The allocation is shown on the Policies Map.

View Comments (3) 4.132 Due to RAF Halton's proximity to Aylesbury and the good linkages between the two by rail and road, the development at RAF Halton should follow the same principles as Aylesbury Garden Town. As Halton Camp is not due to close until 2022, development of this site will not commence until later in the Plan period.

View Comments (3) 4.133 Due to the size of the site, it is expected that there will be further development beyond this plan period, and this will be part of the Local Plan review.  Work is underway on behalf of the DIO in order to establish the broad land uses that might come forward.  This will inform the masterplan supplementary planning document (SPD) for this site.

View Comments (3) 4.134 The site allocation lies within the Metropolitan Green Belt and there are a number of listed buildings on site.  It is adjacent to the Chilterns AONB.  The masterplan SPD for the site will identify how these are to be addressed. Any planning applications for the development of this site will need to have regard to and be in accordance with the masterplan SPD, and the polices for the delivery of Aylesbury Garden Town.

View Comments (3) 4.135 The site outline includes a number of listed barrack blocks, other heritage assets, many non-listed buildings and an existing road network.  It excludes Halton House and its grounds, a number of open recreation areas, areas of woodland and the airfield and associated buildings. As set out in the NPPF, limited infilling or the partial or complete redevelopment of previously developed sites, whether redundant or in continuing use (excluding temporary buildings), which would not have a greater impact on the openness of the Green Belt and the purpose of including land within it than the existing development is an exception to not allowing new housing development in the Green Belt. Therefore it is considered that redevelopment and/or refurbishment of existing buildings in the first phase of development would be appropriate and not require that the site be removed from the Green Belt at this stage.  This is set out in policy S4 in this plan.

View Comments (2) 4.136 The proximity of the Chilterns AONB will need to be addressed in the design and layout of any development. The masterplan SPD for the site will establish the site layout and disposition of land uses.

View Comments (2) 4.137 The development of this site will adhere to the following place-shaping principles:

  • In the first phases, development will be concentrated on those areas that are already built-up, through the redevelopment or remodelling of existing buildings
  • Provision of 50% green infrastructure, to reflect the high level of open space already present on the site including green corridors linking development with the surrounding countryside
  • Provision of links to and from Aylesbury Town and to the wider area including for walking and cycling
  • Respond positively to the best characteristics of the surrounding area.

View Comments (6) 4.138 The vision and objectives for the site are:

  • To deliver a comprehensive redevelopment of this site, including provision of any new and or/improved infrastructure, services and facilities
  • To successfully link this site with Halton and Wendover, whilst protecting the setting of Halton village and the Chilterns AONB and 
  • To link to the green infrastructure network.

View Comments (75) D-HAL003 RAF Halton

Site Ref:

HAL003

Site Name

RAF Halton

Size (hectares)

82ha

Allocated for

Around1,000 homes during the Plan period and associated infrastructure, services and facilities including a primary school, new local centre, new access routes if needed and new green infrastructure

Planning History and Current Planning Status

No relevant planning history

Site-specific Requirements

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the plan, including the principles of development for Aylesbury Garden Town and the Masterplan SPD to be prepared for the site.  In addition, proposals should comply with the following criteria:

  1. Provision of land for 1,000 dwellings during this plan period at a density that takes account of the existing curtilage of the buildings on the site, and that of the adjacent settlement character and identity if appropriate
  2. Be planned using a landscape-led approach, taking account of the character and setting of the Chilterns AONB
  3. Provision of junction improvements onto the B4009 Upper Icknield Way
  4. Provision for public transport into Wendover and to surrounding areas
  5. Establishment of and safeguarding for a network of cycling and walking links
  6. Provision of green infrastructure to link to other new development areas and the wider countryside
  7. Provision of land, buildings and car parking for a combined primary school including playing field provision
  8. Provision of land, buildings and car parking for a new local centre including community hall.

Phasing and Delivery Programme

Development of this site will come forward towards the latter part of the plan period as the site will not be released until 2022.

Detail about phasing and implementation will be set out in the masterplan SPD for the site.

Implementation Approach

Development at RAF Halton will come forward towards the latter end of the Plan period, and only once a masterplan SPD for the allocation has been prepared and adopted by the Council. Proposals for development within the RAF Halton Strategic Site Allocation will be expected to demonstrate how they positively contribute to the achievement of the SPD and the Aylesbury Garden Town principles as set out in Policy D1.


Winslow

View Comments (3) 4.139 Winslow is a small historic market town situated on the A413 approximately nine miles north of Aylesbury and six miles south of Buckingham. The parish has a population of 4,407 (2011 Census). During the Plan period a station is to be provided at Winslow as part of the opening of the East West Rail line between Oxford and Bedford. It is considered one of the most sustainable settlements within Aylesbury Vale with a primary school, specialist school and secondary school which is soon to relocate to a new site, a wide range of shops and services, three public houses as well as a small amount of employment. It has a historic core covered by a conservation area with 81 listed buildings.

View Comments (1) 4.140 The Winslow Neighbourhood Plan was made in September 2014. It contains a number of policies to direct development, including the allocation of 455 new homes, 30 of which are extra care units.

View Comments (19) D-WIN001 Land to east of B4033, Great Horwood Road

Site reference

WIN001

Size (hectares)

20ha

Allocated for

585 homes and green infrastructure

Source

HELAA

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood plan made in September 2014. The land has no notation but is outside the settlement boundary

Phasing

50 homes to be delivered 2017-22 and 535 homes from 2023-2033

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 585 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The development shall be based on a design code to be prepared for the site because it is a large strategic site in a sensitive location on the edge of the settlement and will create a new residential edge to the settlement. The design code should ensure local distinctiveness is reflected in the development, which is the aim of policy 5 in the Winslow Neighbourhood Plan
  3. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA) to be submitted and agreed by the Council
  4. The development will limit built form beyond the watercourse, development will only be to the south of this nearest to the existing built-up area and the proposed railway station
  5. The existing trees, hedgerows and ponds should be retained and where possible integrated into the green infrastructure provision. There should be an ecological buffer provided along the watercourse to the north of the site
  6. A landscape buffer to be provided along the Great Horwood Road to protect the rural character of the village as well as on the new settlement edge that will be created along the north-eastern edge of the development to provide a transition to the adjacent countryside
  7. The site should be accessed via the Great Horwood Road with the provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages through the site, connecting into the new Winslow to Buckingham cycle path (in line with Policy 8 in the Winslow Neighbourhood Plan), and into the town, to the station and school. Development should also maximise opportunities to get multiple pedestrian and cycle linkages between the site and the existing built-up area to ensure the communities become integrated and to reduce the hard barrier of the railway line
  8. The development must provide improvements to the A413 and the junction with the Great Horwood Road. It should be provided with a bus service, in line with Policy 9 of the Winslow Neighbourhood Plan
  9. The development should be in compliance with the relevant policies set out in the Winslow Neighbourhood Plan
  10. All development within the Buckingham and River Ouzel Internal Drainage Board (IDB) area must observe the IDB Byelaws
  11. Detailed modelling  will be required to confirm  flood zone and climate change extents. The Environment Agency and lead local flood authority should be consulted to obtain the latest hydraulic modelling information for the site at the time of the flood risk assessment. They will advise as to whether existing detailed models need to be updated.
  12. The impact of  blockage of structures on flood risk should also be modelled
  13. The development should be designed using a sequential approach. Flood Zones 2 and 3 and 3a plus climate change (subject to detailed flood risk assessment) should be preserved as green space with built development restricted to Flood Zone 1.

Delivering the allocated sites – at larger villages

View Comments (1) 4.141 Larger villages are the largest, most sustainable villages that have reasonable access to services and facilities.  As set out in Policies S2 and S3, larger villages will provide a total of 1,963 new homes between 2013 and 2033. Those sites that already have planning permission (as at 2016/17) and homes already built in the period 2013-2017 are included in the total to be provided.

No Comments 4.142 Recognising the need for the larger villages to accommodate growth in line with the sustainability of these settlements and their current size, sites that have been found suitable for housing in the Housing and Economic Land Availability Assessment (HELAA) are allocated in this plan, apart from at Aston Clinton (because the village has high existing completions/commitments and no additional school capacity) and Stoke Mandeville (due to its proximity to the growth at Aylesbury Garden Town).  In addition, where a neighbourhood plan has reached an advanced stage but is not yet made, sites proposed to be allocated in the neighbourhood plan for housing are allocated in this Plan.

View Comments (1) 4.143 Allocations are made at the following larger villages:

  • Steeple Claydon (118)
  • Stone (10)
  • Whitchurch (22)

No Comments 4.144 All other larger villages do not have any identified capacity for housing on suitable sites and therefore no allocations are made at these villages.

No Comments 4.145 Development in the larger villages that is not allocated in the Local Plan or a neighbourhood plan will only be permitted in exceptional circumstances where it can be demonstrated that sites allocated are not coming forward at the rate anticipated.  Proposals will need to be accompanied by evidence demonstrating how the site can be delivered in a timely manner, along with satisfying each of the criteria set out in policy D2 above.

Steeple Claydon

No Comments 4.146 The village of Steeple Claydon sits around a flat hill, to the north‐west of Aylesbury, located between the A421, A413 and A41. It is encircled by the villages of Middle Claydon and Calvert to the south, Twyford to the west and Hillesden and Padbury to the north. There are no other settlements in the parish itself. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 2,278. The parish has good provision of services and facilities. A neighbourhood plan is in the process of being prepared and was submitted to the Council in May 2017.

No Comments 4.147 The water cycle study (2017) assessed the impact of growth on water cycle infrastructure in the village. The following policy is to ensure that growth takes place with any upgrades to the treatment works that may be needed. The HELAA included a consultation with Buckinghamshire County Council which identified the need for better connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists.

View Comments (2) D-SCD003 Land at Queen Catherine Road

Site reference

SCD003

Size (hectares)

0.26ha

Allocated for

8 homes

Source

HELAA and the draft Neighbourhood Plan

Current neighbourhood plan status

Submission stage consultation.

Allocated site Policy SC5 for up to eight new homes

Phasing

The site is anticipated to be delivered between 2018 and 2023.

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around eight dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. Any proposal shall be based on a design code to be prepared for the site given the site's visibility in this prominent edge-of-settlement location
  3. Any scheme shall have regard to the character of the surrounding development, particularly the larger plots to the immediate west of the site and opposite the site
  4. The site includes a small paddock hedge on two sides and a small amount of scrub which have biodiversity value and should be retained as part of a comprehensive soft landscaping and ecological enhancement scheme
  5. Any proposal shall be supported by an archaeological assessment to identify and protect any remains of more than local importance
  6. Any proposal needs to ensure satisfactory pedestrian walking and cycling access into the village. The scheme layout should retain and incorporate the public right of way (PROW) on its established route
  7. Any proposal must provide a satisfactory vehicular access in consultation with the highways authority
  8. Anglian Water has identified deficiencies in the surface water infrastructure capacity at the Steeple Claydon Sewerage Treatment Works. Any proposal will be required to ensure satisfactory capacity and mitigation has been agreed with the statutory provider in order to meet the needs of the development.

View Comments (2) D-SCD008 Land at Molly's Folly/Molly's Field, west of Addison Road

Site reference

SCD008

Size (hectares)

4.6ha

Allocated for

110 homes and green infrastructure, sustainable drainage scheme

Source

HELAA and the draft neighbourhood plan

Current neighbourhood plan status

Submission stage consultation.

Allocated site Policy SC2 for up to 110 new homes, a convenience food retail scheme, medical services and green infrastructure

Phasing

The site is anticipated to be delivered between 2018 and 2023

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 110 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. Any proposal shall be based on a design code to be prepared for the site that takes account of, amongst other characteristics, the site's visibility in this prominent edge-of-settlement location as well as any statutory and non-statutory heritage assets
  3. The mature trees and hedgerows within and on the site boundary should be retained and protected as part of a landscape scheme. In addition, any proposal to be supported by a comprehensive soft landscape planting scheme including mature trees. Green infrastructure should be provided in the southern part of the site and take account of the sustainable drainage strategy required
  4. Any proposal must have full regard to preserving and enhancing designated heritage assets in West Street
  5. Any proposal needs to ensure satisfactory pedestrian walking and cycling access into the village. The scheme layout should retain and incorporate the public right of way (PROW) on its established route
  6. Any proposal must provide a satisfactory vehicular access in consultation with the highways authority
  7. Detailed modelling will be required to confirm flood zone and climate change extents (see 'Available modelled data'), and flood extents at lower return periods (below 100 year). The Environment Agency and lead local flood authority should be consulted to obtain the latest hydraulic modelling information for the site at the time of the flood risk assessment. They will advise as to whether existing detailed models need to be updated
  8. The development should be designed using a sequential approach. Flood Zones 2 and 3, and 3a plus climate change (subject to a detailed flood risk assessment) should be preserved as green space, with built development restricted to Flood Zone 1
  9. A sustainable drainage strategy will be required for the site, based on sustainable drainage principles and an assessment submitted to the Council for approval
  10. Anglian Water has identified deficiencies in the surface water infrastructure capacity at the Steeple Claydon Sewerage Treatment Works. Any proposal will be required to ensure satisfactory capacity and mitigation has been agreed with the statutory provider in order to meet the needs of the development.

Stone

No Comments 4.148 Stone is located a few miles to the south-west of Aylesbury with close links to the Hartwell House estate which lies a mile to the north-east of the village. The historic core of the village is concentrated around St John the Baptist's Church, which is located to the south of the A418, close to where it forms a junction with Eythrope Road, Bishopstone Road and Church Way. The wider village of Stone extends for approximately a mile along the busy A418 which links Aylesbury to the north-east to Thame to the south-west. The village has many facilities including shops, a church, a school, public houses and restaurants. The conservation area is restricted to a handful of historic buildings centred around the Church and the junction of the A418, Eythrope Road, Bishopstone Road and Church Way. The village sits at the eastern end of a low sand and limestone ridge which overlooks the Thame Valley to the north and the Chiltern Hills to the south.

No Comments 4.149 The water cycle study (2017) assessed the impact of growth on water cycle infrastructure in the village. The following policy is to ensure that growth takes place with any upgrades to the treatment works that may be needed. The HELAA included a consultation with Buckinghamshire County Council which identified the need for better connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists.

View Comments (2) D-STO008 Land south of Creslow Way, Stone

Site reference

STO008

Size (hectares)

1.2ha

Allocated for

10 homes, green infrastructure

Source

HELAA

Current neighbourhood plan status

No neighbourhood plan

Phasing

The site is expected to be delivered between 2017 and 2022

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 10 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA) and inform preparation of a layout and landscape scheme to provide landscape mitigation enhancements and green infrastructure
  3. The scheme needs to retain the  hedge and mature trees on the site
  4. The scheme layout has regard to the findings of an archaeological investigation and preserves in situ any remains of more than local importance
  5. Contribution to Haddenham to Aylesbury cycle route
  6. The development must provide a satisfactory vehicular access to be agreed with Buckinghamshire County Council
  7. A surface water drainage strategy will be required (4% of the site is vulnerable to a 1 in 1,000 year surface water flood – SFRA Level 1)
  8. An assessment of sewerage capacity and water resources and water supply will be required in consultation with Thames Water.

Whitchurch

No Comments 4.150 Whitchurch straddles the A413 Aylesbury to Buckingham road approximately five miles north of Aylesbury and 12 miles south of Buckingham. The settlement is predominately linear, mostly consisting of one street with minor roads heading off.  Whitchurch is on a prominent ridge of the Brill‐Wing Hills. There are long-distance views in all directions. The surrounding land is mainly pastoral with hedgerows and mature trees. There is grazing land towards the north and several blocks of broadleaved woodlands towards the west. Whitchurch is a historic settlement with buildings dating back to the 13th century. There are many fine examples of medieval buildings within the village.

View Comments (3) D-WHI009 Holt's Field, Whitchurch

Site reference

WHI009

Size (hectares)

0.8ha

Allocated for

22 homes

Description

The site is located to the north-east of Newman Close in Whitchurch. The site is bordered by residential dwellings to the south-east and south-west, and agricultural fields to the north-east and north-west

Source

HELAA – developer-promoted site

Current planning application (as yet undetermined) 16/02244/AOP

Current neighbourhood plan status

No made neighbourhood plan

Phasing

The site should be delivered during 2018-2023

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 22 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach
  3. The site will be developed in accordance with the 'Defining the special qualities of local landscape designations in Aylesbury Vale District' report (March 2016)
  4. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA)
  5. Existing trees and hedgerows should be retained
  6. Landscape buffer to be provided on the north-eastern boundary to minimise impact on the surrounding area
  7. The site should be accessed via Newman Close with the provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages through the site and into Whitchurch
  8. An assessment of sewerage capacity needs to be carried to identify the need for infrastructure upgrades and how and when these will be carried out.

Delivering the allocated sites – at medium villages

View Comments (5) 4.151 Medium villages are moderately well served with services and facilities and can therefore be considered to be reasonably sustainable villages.  As set out in Policies S2 and S3, medium villages will provide a total of 1,095 new homes between 2013 and 2033. Those sites that already have planning permission (as at 2016/17) and homes already built in the period 2013-2017 are included in the total to be provided.

View Comments (4) 4.152 Recognising the need for the medium villages to make some contribution to meeting the housing needs of the district, but acknowledging that these villages are less sustainable than the larger villages as they have fewer amenities and public transport services, some development is allocated at medium villages.  Sites that have been found suitable for housing in the Housing and Economic Land Availability Assessment (HELAA) have been the starting point, but these have been subject to further detailed consideration based on specific local factors.  HELAA suitable sites are allocated at medium villages apart from at: Bierton and Weston Turville due to their proximity to the growth at Aylesbury Garden Town; Great Horwood and Cheddington because they have made neighbourhood plans which allocate sites for housing; Marsworth, Brill, Padbury and Tingewick because the suitable HELAA sites are too uncertain due to lack of information about suitable access; and Stoke Hammond because of the high level of completions/commitments. Newton Longville and Maids Moreton have an excess of suitable HELAA sites beyond a reasonable amount for a medium village, and so the most sustainable site(s) has been selected at these locations.

View Comments (6) 4.153 Allocations are therefore made at the following medium villages:

View Comments (4) 4.154 Additional development in the medium villages that are not allocated either in the Local Plan or neighbourhood plan will only be permitted in exceptional circumstances where it can be demonstrated that sites allocated are not coming forward at the rate anticipated.  Proposals will need to be accompanied by evidence demonstrating how the site can be delivered in a timely manner, along with satisfying the each of the criteria set out in Policy D4 above.

Cuddington

No Comments 4.155 Cuddington is located six miles to the west of Aylesbury, to the north of the A418. The centre of the village is based around a series of narrow lanes, which has been designated as a conservation area. Most modern development is located to the south side of the village along Dadbrook and the Aylesbury Road.

View Comments (4) D-CDN001 Land north of Aylesbury Road and rear of Great Stone House

Site reference

CDN001

Size (hectares)

0.27ha

Allocated for

6 dwellings

Source

Call for sites

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

1 – 5 years

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around six dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach
  3. The site will be developed in accordance with the 'Defining the special qualities of local landscape designations in Aylesbury Vale District' report (March 2016)
  4. The development will limit built form towards the Aylesbury Road frontage
  5. The existing trees and hedgerows should be retained except where access vision splays are required
  6. The development will be designed in a way that respects the Cuddington conservation area
  7. The site should be accessed via Aylesbury Road with the provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages into the village.

View Comments (4) D-CDN003 Dadbrook Farm

Site reference

CDN003

Size (hectares)

1.94ha

Allocated for

15 dwellings

Source

Call for sites

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

1 – 5 years

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of 15 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach
  3. The site will be developed in accordance with the 'Defining the special qualities of local landscape designations in Aylesbury Vale District' report (March 2016)
  4. The development will limit built form to the north of the site, with no built form extending south and south-east of the fence line
  5. The existing trees and hedgerows should be retained
  6. The development will be designed in a way that conserves heritage assets
  7. The site should be accessed via Dadbrook with the provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages through the site and into the village.

Ickford

No Comments 4.156 Picturesque Ickford is close to the boundary with Oxfordshire, north of Tiddington and about four miles west of the market town of Thame.  Ickford parish had a population of 680 people in the 2011 Census. The village has a number of amenities including St Nicholas Church from 1170, a village hall, play area, allotments, Ickford (primary) School, Village Stores and The Rising Sun pub/restaurant. A conservation area was designated in 1991. The older parts of the village are concentrated in four main areas, at Little Ickford, Church Road, Worminghall Road and around the Bridge Road/Sheldon Road junction. The latter half of the 20th century has seen these four pockets of development connected by modern infilling, particularly on the north side of Sheldon Road and also along the Worminghall and Bridge Roads.

No Comments 4.157 The water cycle study (2017) assessed the impact of growth on water cycle infrastructure in the village. The following policy is to ensure that growth takes place with any upgrades to the treatment works that may be needed.

View Comments (3) D-ICK004 Land off Turnfields

Site reference

ICK004

Size (hectares)

1.4ha

Allocated for

20 homes

Source

HELAA

Current neighbourhood plan status

No neighbourhood plan

Phasing

The site is expected to be delivered between 2018 and 2023.

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 20 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA) and inform preparation of  a layout and landscape scheme to provide landscape mitigation enhancements
  3. The development must provide a satisfactory vehicular access, visibility and parking to be agreed with Buckinghamshire County Council following submission of a transport assessment and transport statement to the Council. Pedestrian links to local facilities may need to be improved
  4. An ecological management plan shall be submitted to the Council and approved as part of a planning application setting out the biodiversity value on the site and a mitigation strategy with the aim of the scheme delivering a net biodiversity gain for the loss of any value on the site
  5. An assessment of sewerage capacity and water resources and water supply will be required in consultation with Thames Water. Upgrades may be required and form part of the Thames Water Asset Management Plan.

Maids Moreton

View Comments (21) 4.158 Maids Moreton is situated approximately a mile to the north-east of the centre of Buckingham which was the main market town and thus the outlet for agricultural produce and the source of professional services for surrounding settlements. Maids Moreton has always retained its independence and a strong sense of place despite the expansion of Buckingham reaching the edge of the village. The parish has a population of 847 (2011 Census). The village core contains a number of historic buildings, in particular a significant group of timber-framed buildings dating from the 17th century. There were a number of housing developments in the 20th century extending the original village core including the Pightle in 1922, the Leys in 1949, Church Close in 1953, Manor Park in 1965 and Glebe Close in 1982. The focus of the village is centred on the church of St Edmund, and its neighbours, The Old Rectory and Maids Moreton Hall. Maids Moreton also has a village hall, Maids Moreton (primary) School, The Wheatsheaf public house, The Vet Centre and a number of businesses at Vitalograph Business Park.

View Comments (73) D-MMO006 Land east of Walnut Drive and west of Foscote Road

Site reference

MMO006

Size (hectares)

7.7ha

Allocated for

170 homes, green infrastructure and surface water drainage

Source

HELAA and planning application 16/00151/AOP (pending)

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood Area designated June 2016. No neighbourhood plan stages reached.

Phasing

The site is expected to be delivered between 2017 and 2022.

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of 170 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity and the edge of countryside location
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA)  and a landscape scheme with green infrastructure to be approved by the Council
  3. A satisfactory vehicular access, parking, cycle and walking movement strategy needs to be proposed in a transport assessment and transport statement agreed by the Council setting out necessary highways improvements as required
  4. Ensure the public footpath (MMT/2/1) connecting the development with Maids Moreton's school, village hall, pub, bus stops and other services is in a suitable condition to safely and conveniently accommodate increased pedestrian and cycle traffic within a residential setting
  5. An updated assessment of wastewater treatment works capacity and surface water network capacity needs to be carried out, working with Anglian Water, to identify the need for infrastructure upgrades and how and when these will be carried out to inform site delivery. Furthermore, development shall not begin until a surface water drainage scheme for the site, based on sustainable drainage principles and an assessment of the hydrological and hydro-geological context of the development, has been submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning authority
  6. An ecological management plan shall be submitted to the Council and approved as part of a planning application setting out the biodiversity value on the site and a mitigation strategy with the aim of the scheme delivering a net biodiversity gain for the loss of any value on the site
  7. No development shall take place until an applicant, or their agents or successors in title, have secured the implementation of a programme of archaeological work in accordance with a written scheme of investigation which has been submitted by the applicant and approved by the planning authority
  8. Outdoor playing space (OPS) and equipped play facilities should be provided on site. Both Appendix 2 of the AVDC Supplementary Planning Guidance for Sport & Leisure Facilities and Appendix 1 of its companion document the Ready Reckoner detail the level of provision required per settlement size. As the 2017 'Open Space, Sports and Recreation Needs for Aylesbury Vale' audit shows there is a lack of a suitably sized central public open space as well as no neighbourhood equipped area of play (NEAP) in Maids Moreton, meaning there is a requirement to provide such facilities (in addition to a local equipped area of play (LEAP)) on site in order to make this proposal acceptable in recreation terms. This open green space will also provide an alternative to Foxcote Reservoir and Wood SSSI and help avoid recreational impacts on the designated site
  9. A good mix of affordable property types and sizes reflective of the overall housing mix whilst taking in to account the local needs of the district. There is currently a greater need for two bedroom 4 person and three bedroom five of six person houses, slightly less for one-bed two person and four-bed seven or eight person. Houses are generally preferred over flats
  10. A tenure mix of 75% rented and 25% shared ownership for the affordable dwellings would be required and two or three bed houses are preferred over flats for shared ownership
  11. Clusters of affordable housing must not exceed our 15 unit maximum for houses and 18 maximum for flats
  12. Affordable units should be built to National Affordable Housing Programme requirements and should not be distinguishable from market housing in terms of overall design details, build quality and materials. No more than 50% of the private units are to be completed until the affordable units have been completed
  13. The Council works in partnership with registered providers in the district and can supply details of these to support the delivery of the affordable homes.

Marsh Gibbon

View Comments (2) 4.159 Marsh Gibbon lies in the west of the district, four miles to the east of Bicester and 12 miles west of Aylesbury. It is considered a medium village in the settlement hierarchy, with the parish having a population of 969 (2011 Census) and some limited services including an infant school, a small village store and two public houses. The village has three historic core areas, one around The Greyhound Pub, one around Ware Pond and The Plough Inn and a further one around the church. These areas have  linked with newer development over time and form one settlement but with some remaining open green areas. Large parts of the village are covered by a conservation area designation reflecting this historic environment. 

No Comments 4.160 Marsh Gibbon Parish Council prepared a neighbourhood plan  which was made in 2015 and set out a number of policies to guide development including the designation of two Local Green Spaces. It did not make specific allocations for housing.

View Comments (4) D-MGB003 Leopold Farm and area to the west

Site reference

MGB003

Size (hectares)

0.59ha

Allocated for

9 dwellings

Source

HELAA and planning application (16/03380/AOP) approved subject to S106

Current neighbourhood plan status

Neighbourhood plan, made February 2015. The land has no notation in the neighbourhood plan

Phasing

The site is expected to be delivered between 2017 and 2022

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around nine dwellings with a density, form and layout that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity, in particular keeping the visual links between the village and the agricultural land behind the site
  2. The development will limit built form to the centre and east of the site, retaining open space and allowing for views to be retained in and out of the conservation area to the agricultural land behind the site, keeping the connection to the rural setting of the village
  3. The existing trees and hedgerows should be retained
  4. The development will be designed in a way that conserves heritage assets, in particular the setting of the listed building at Swan Farm and the setting of the conservation area opposite the site
  5. The site should be accessed via Castle Street with the provision of pedestrian and cycle linkages through the site and improvements to the pedestrian footpath along Castle Street
  6. The development should be in compliance with the relevant policies set out in the Marsh Gibbon Neighbourhood Plan.
  7. Surface water modelling should be undertaken to define the level of surface water risk and the risk areas/flow paths. Climate change should be modelled using the +- 40% allowance (February 2016) for rainfall intensity
  8. Drainage designs should 'design for exceedance' and accommodate existing surface water flow routes.

Newton Longville

View Comments (2) 4.161 Newton Longville lies to the north-east of the district, two miles south-west of Bletchley, 16 miles to the north of Aylesbury, 10 miles east of Buckingham and seven miles north west of Leighton Buzzard. It is considered a medium village in the settlement hierarchy, with the parish having a population of 1,846 (2011 Census) and some limited services including a church, a nursery and junior school, a post office and small village store and two public houses.

No Comments 4.162 The village is accessed from the south via Drayton Road/Newton Road, from the west via Whaddon Road, from the east via Stoke Road and from the north via Bletchley Road. Over the years the village has experienced infill development between Drayton Road and Whaddon Road.

View Comments (3) D-NLV005 Land south of Whaddon Road and west of Lower Rd, Newton Longville

Site reference

NLV005

Size (hectares)

0.3ha

Allocated for

17 dwellings

Source

HELAA suitable/planning application (17/01107/AOP) – outline application with access to be considered and all other matters reserved for a residential development of around  17 dwellings including a new access point off Whaddon Road

Current neighbourhood plan status

N/A

Phasing

Delivery within 1-5 years of VALP adoption

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. The site will make provision for around 17 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character
  2. The site should be accessed via Whaddon Road and be accompanied by a design and access statement
  3. The site will need to provide for a footpath extension from the site access to Longueville Hall and access to Hammond Park
  4. A transport statement will be required to assess the developments impact on the highway and where necessary public transportation network
  5. An assessment of sewerage capacity and/or water supply will be required in consultation with Thames Water
  6. The development design and layout will be informed by a full detailed landscape and visual impact assessment (LVIA)
  7. Any proposed development should be expected to provide a buffer to address all boundaries.

Quainton

View Comments (1) 4.163 Quainton is located on the lower slopes of Quainton Hill and due to its elevated position, spectacular panoramic views can be gained from numerous vantage points throughout the village. The elevated position of Quainton also renders it visually prominent in views from the surrounding landscape. Parts of the parish were part of the ancient Bernwood Forest which covers a vast area into Oxfordshire and has significant biodiversity value. Quainton has a large village green, a medieval church, rectory, Baptist chapel, tower windmill and a mix of housing including timber-framed 17th century black and white thatched cottages, Georgian farmhouses, Victorian terraces and modern properties.

View Comments (1) D-QUA001 Land south west of 62 Station Road, Quainton

Site reference

QUA001

Size (hectares)

0.6ha

Allocated for

13 homes

Source

HELAA – developer-promoted site and planning application reference 15/04276 (as yet undetermined)

Current neighbourhood plan status

The Quainton Neighbourhood Plan was made in 2016, but it does not allocate sites for development

Phasing

The site is anticipated to be delivered between 2018 and 2023.

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 13 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach
  3. The site should be accessed off Station Road
  4. The development must provide pedestrian and cycle routes to key destinations in the village including bus stops, the school and the village centre. Appropriate crossing points for key routes must be provided. Cycle parking at bus stops should be provided due to walking distance
  5. As 26% of the site is vulnerable to surface water flooding, as identified in the Level 2 SFRA carried out for this site. A site-specific flood risk assessment and surface water drainage strategy are required. to ensure that the development does not increase flood risk elsewhere and takes the opportunity to reduce flood risk for houses across Station Road 
  6. Surface water modelling should be undertaken to define the level of surface water and the risk areas/flow paths. Climate change should be modelled using the +-40%  allowance for rainfall intensity. Development proposals must comply with the SFRA Level 2 Guidance for site design and making development safe. Drainage designs  should 'design for exceedance' and accommodate existing surface water flow routes water flow routes, with development located outside of surface water flood risk areas
  7. An ecological management plan (EMP) shall be submitted to the Council and approved. Development contributing to the connectivity of the Bernwood forest habitat and the conservation and maintenance of habitat for Bernwood species will be supported.

View Comments (1) D-QUA0014-016 Land adjacent to Station Road, Quainton

Site reference

QUA014 (QUA014, 015 and 016 combined)

Size (hectares)

1.25ha

Allocated for

24 homes

Source

HELAA – developer-promoted site.  Part of the site has an undetermined planning application for a Certificate of Appropriate Alternative Development for residential (use class C3) purposes comprising 4 dwellings (16/03886/A17)

Current neighbourhood plan status

The Quainton Neighbourhood Plan was made in 2016, but it does not allocate sites for development

Phasing

The site is anticipated to be delivered between 2018 and 2023.

Site criteria

Development proposals must be accompanied by the information required in the Council's Local Validation List and comply with all other relevant policies in the Plan.  In addition, proposals should comply with all of the following criteria:

  1. Provision of around 24 dwellings at a density that takes account of the adjacent settlement character and identity
  2. The site will be designed using a landscape-led approach
  3. The site should be accessed off Station Road
  4. The development must provide pedestrian and cycle routes to key destinations in the village including bus stops, the school and the village centre. Appropriate crossing points for key routes must be provided. Cycle parking at bus stops should be provided due to walking distance.
  5. An ecological management plan (EMP) shall be submitted to the Council and approved. Development contributing to the connectivity of the Bernwood forest habitat and the conservation and maintenance of habitat for Bernwood species will be supported.

Delivering sites at smaller villages

View Comments (1) 4.164 Smaller villages have relatively poor access to services and facilities and are therefore only suited to accommodating small-scale development.  As such, no specific allocations are made at smaller villages in this plan.

View Comments (3) 4.165 The housing requirement for smaller villages will be met through a combination of sites allocated in neighbourhood plans and sites coming forward as part of the development management process.  At smaller villages particular emphasis is given to the role of local communities in identifying how best to meet their own development needs through neighbourhood plans as set out in more detail in Policy D2.

View Comments (1) 4.166 The HELAA has identified some suitable sites at smaller villages which indicates that there is a realistic prospect of some if not all of these sites coming forward during the Plan period.  Therefore a windfall allowance is assumed, which includes an allowance for the smaller villages. 

View Comments (20) D3 Housing development at smaller villages

Where there is no made neighbourhood plan in place, new housing development at smaller villages will be supported where it contributes to the sustainability of that village and is in accordance with all applicable policies in the Local Plan, provided that the proposed development fulfils all of the following criteria:

  1. is located within the existing developed footprint of the village* or is substantially enclosed by existing built development  
  2. would not lead to coalescence with any neighbouring settlement
  3. is of a small scale (normally five dwellings or fewer) (net) and in a location that is in keeping with the existing form of the settlement and would not adversely affect its character and appearance
  4. respects and retains natural boundaries and features such as trees, hedgerows, embankments and drainage ditches
  5. would not have any significant adverse impact on environmental assets such as landscape, historic environment, biodiversity, waterways, open space and green infrastructure, and
  6. can be served by existing infrastructure

*the existing developed footprint is defined as the continuous built form of the village, and excludes individual buildings and groups of dispersed buildings. This includes former agricultural barns that have been converted, agricultural buildings and associated land on the edge of the village and gardens, paddocks and other undeveloped land within the curtilage of buildings on the edge of the settlement where the land relates more to the surrounding countryside than to the built-up area of the village

Assessing proposals at other settlements

View Comments (1) 4.167 New housing development at other settlements will be very strictly controlled to ensure that new development is directed to the most sustainable locations in the district. The replacement of existing homes and the infilling of one or two homes in an otherwise built-up frontage will generally be acceptable, provided that the proposal is in accordance with all other relevant policies in the Local Plan.

No Comments 4.168 Dwellings that come forward under this policy will count towards the windfall allowance set out in Policy S2.

View Comments (6) D4 Housing at other settlements

In other settlements, permission for the construction of new homes will only be granted:

  1. in the exceptional circumstances of providing affordable housing to meet local housing needs established through a housing need survey, or housing necessary for the purposes of essential rural needs, or
  2. for infilling of small gaps in developed frontages with one or two homes in keeping with the scale and spacing of nearby homes, and for the replacement of existing homes in their original curtilage, where there would be no adverse effect on the character of the countryside or other planning interests, subject to other policies in the Local Plan.

The need for new employment land

View Comments (1) 4.169 Future employment requirements for the district have been assessed as part of the Buckinghamshire Housing and Economic Development Needs Assessment (HEDNA, Opinion Research Services and Atkins, December 2015).  The assessment used an economic forecast from Oxford Economics to predict the number of workers  there will be by 2033. They assessed the amount of floor space required for each employment use  to accommodate that number of workers.  This was then converted into land area requirements for each employment use – the 'demand' calculation. The 'supply' was then assessed taking account of any existing employment allocations in either the old Local Plan or neighbourhood plans, sites with planning permission minus sites that have prior approval to be converted from offices to residential development.

No Comments 4.170 An addendum to the Bucks HEDNA provides additional information, analysis and clarification (Atkins, June 2017).  The addendum takes account of additional factors, including sensitivity testing employment density assumptions (how much floorspace is required per worker for different types of employment use), analysis of past employment floorspace completions and a property market report.  As with the Buckinghamshire HEDNA, this identifies the supply-demand balance in terms of land requirements, noting  an oversupply of employment land in Aylesbury Vale compared with estimated need. This amounts to a surplus of around 300,000 sqm of total B use class land in the district, mainly the result of unimplemented planning consents. 

No Comments 4.171 A property market review carried out by Buckinghamshire Thames Valley Local Enterprise Partnership (BTVLEP) presents a different picture to that presented by the HEDNA (Buckinghamshire Office and Industrial Floor Space Market Review, June 2017).  Based on recent transactions, supply in the pipeline and analysis of market trends, the review notes there is weak demand in the office sector and an industrial sector that outperforms the office sector. With regard to warehousing, the review notes that the area is constrained compared to other locations.

No Comments 4.172 When planning for future employment requirements it is important to consider employment land in the context of the wider Functional Economic Market Area (FEMA), which also includes Wycombe, Chiltern and South Buckinghamshire, none of which are able to meet employment floorspace requirements set out in the HEDNA. For the FEMA, the HEDNA Addendum analysis of supply and demand indicates a shortage of office and warehousing floorspace and a surplus of industrial land.  This Plan recognises that Aylesbury Vale's surplus of employment land can help make up for shortages elsewhere in the FEMA. However, it is considered unlikely that Aylesbury Vale could make up the entire shortfall of other authorities in the FEMA, in particular with regard to warehousing, given locational constraints.

No Comments 4.173 The Council has examined the potential for reducing the level of employment provision in the district. This has focused on reviewing sites where it is considered employment use does not need to be protected in the long term.  It should be noted that for the market to function efficiently and to allow effectively for churn, choice and flexibility, it will always be necessary for the supply of land and premises to be in excess of projected future demand.

Provision of new employment land

View Comments (1) 4.174 Continuing provision of land and premises suitable for employment uses is needed, of a type and scale appropriate to the characteristics of the local area. This should provide sufficient opportunities for employment needs to be met locally, reduce the need to travel to work, and promote economic growth and social inclusion. This will be achieved by the protection of suitable existing employment sites, (including enterprise zones), from other forms of development, existing commitments and allocations. A flexible approach is required to allow employment development to come forward on other suitable sites where a specific requirement needs to be met.  Re-use or replacement of an existing building in an urban or rural area will be supported provided this is well designed, appropriate to its context having regard to the scale of the proposal, location and impact on the surrounding area.

No Comments 4.175 The general principle relating to employment land and premises is that fit-for-purpose B1, B2 and B8 key employment sites should be safeguarded to maintain a diverse range of business activities in the district. Surplus sites that are not fit for purpose should be considered for release to other uses.  Any existing B1, B2 and B8 businesses affected by the loss of employment land should be relocated to alternative premises so viable businesses are not affected.

View Comments (7) D5 Provision of employment land

Employment development will generally be supported in sustainable locations:

  1. through allocations in this plan and appropriate allocations in neighbourhood plans
  2. through the intensification or extension of existing premises
  3. as part of a farm diversification scheme
  4. through the appropriate re-use or replacement of an existing building, or
  5. in a rural location where this is essential for that type of business.

Proposals for suitable live-work developments which will not diminish normal residential amenity, will be permitted in locations considered suitable for open market residential development. The subsequent conversion of such units to full residential use will not be permitted unless evidence can be submitted that there is no prospect of the unit being used for that purpose.

Employment land is allocated in the following locations:

Aston Clinton Road MDA[15]: 5,000 sqm B1

Kingsbrook: 10 hectares (estimated 40,000 sqm) B1/B2/B8  (see Policy D-AGT6 )[16]

Berryfields: 9 hectares/36,000 sqm B1/B2/B8 (see Policy D-AGT5)[17]

Hampden Fields 3,650 sqm B1a, 14,600 sqm B1c. 3,650 sqm B2 and 7,300 sqm B8 (total 29,200 sqm  (see Policy D-AGT4 )[18]

Woodlands, College Road (part of Woodlands/Arla Enterprise Zone): 25,600 sqm B1b, 44,400 sqm B2 and 32,800 sqm B8 (total 102,800 b use) (see Policy D-AGT3 )[19]

Salden Chase: 2.07 hectares (see Policy D-NLV001)[20]

Town, village and local centres to support new and existing communities

No Comments 4.176 Town, village and local centres across the district are crucial in supporting the growth of sustainable communities by being a focal point for local communities in terms of services, retail, leisure and employment. It is therefore important to retain a hierarchy of centres and a 'town centre first' approach for those areas, in order to support the growth and distribution proposed in the VALP's strategy and help retain local distinctiveness across the district.

No Comments 4.177 Changes in the way that people shop mean that the role of town, village and local centres is evolving. Growth in internet shopping and other factors mean the focus of town and local centres in future is likely to be more diverse than the traditional retail role. The VALP provides a flexible approach to be able to accommodate potential changes in the role of town and local centres during the Plan period. The strategy and policy approach seeks to ensure town and local centres will flourish and prosper, providing a mix of uses. 

No Comments 4.178 Within the district Aylesbury town centre is the largest centre, followed by Buckingham town centre, and on a smaller scale the centres at Wendover, Winslow and Haddenham. Aylesbury and Buckingham are both operating as the main town centres in the district, offering a range of social, cultural, leisure and employment functions for a wide catchment area. However, they are competing with nearby larger centres at  Milton Keynes, Bicester, Oxford, and to a lesser extent High Wycombe, Hemel Hempstead, and Luton. Aylesbury has a number of local centres that provide an important local shopping role that should be maintained.

No Comments 4.179 Aylesbury will remain the principal retail and service centre in the district recognising its role as a potential Garden Town, but the town centre needs continued investment and revitalisation. There has been significant investment in the transport infrastructure and cultural offer at Aylesbury in recent years including development of the Waterside Theatre, Waterside North and the surrounding area. Policy D7 sets out a strategy for growth and revitalisation of Aylesbury town centre. The policy sets out further details about how the vision will be implemented and allocates a site in the town centre for redevelopment.

View Comments (1) 4.180 Buckingham town centre also needs to build on its programme of regeneration to maximise the benefits continuing growth can bring, and to support the level of jobs and homes growth proposed for the northern part of the district. Growth of the university campus is likely to play a role in this. Some of these issues are addressed in the made Buckingham Neighbourhood Plan. It sets out policies to revitalise and grow Buckingham town centre.

View Comments (1) 4.181 To support economic, retail and leisure activity in centres within the other strategic settlements of Winslow, Wendover and Haddenham, the Council will encourage a mix of uses as well as resisting the loss of essential provision. The policy seeks to create a positive framework to support economic growth and diversity in town and local centres with a mix of uses which can include retail, leisure, services and employment.

No Comments 4.182 Similar to the approach for supporting employment growth, the strategy for town, village and local centres seeks flexibility to support opportunities for sustainable growth. This approach also recognises that a variety of uses, as well as retail, need to be encouraged to support local, village and town centres, particularly at strategic centres. This will enable them to compete with centres outside the district, make them more sustainable and support their renaissance.

No Comments 4.183 Community services and local facilities continue to be important in local and village centres. The strategy seeks to resist the loss of essential facilities and businesses such as local shops, pubs and post offices and wider community services so that communities continue to thrive and do not stagnate or go into decline. Policy I3 covers this in more detail. The Council will support communities in preparing neighbourhood plans to help address these issues.

No Comments 4.184 New local centres are to be provided within major development areas which will be key to supporting sustainable development.

No Comments 4.185 Town centres also have an important contribution towards meeting the requirement for housing. Residential development in the right location adds to the vitality and viability of the town centre and helps reduce the need to travel as people can live close to work and local services. However, this must not lead to the loss of locations required for uses directly related to the town centre and its shopping and leisure functions, and should be of an appropriate scale.

No Comments 4.186 Town centres are suitable locations for residential development of an appropriate scale and form in order to contribute to the mix of uses and create a vibrant centre. This should comprise a mix of tenures and sizes of units including affordable housing (in line with Policy H2).

No Comments 4.187 Aylesbury Vale Retail Study 2015 identifies the need for growth of retail (convenience or comparison) beyond that which is already committed in allocations or planning permissions. Aylesbury Town Centre Retail Capacity Update (December 2016) provides updated figures for Aylesbury Town Centre convenience floorspace capacity and district-wide comparison floorspace capacity. The update takes account of an increase in the catchment area and growth in the resident population which results in increased expenditure availability and advises that the 2029 and 2033 capacity figures be reviewed in five years time. In light of these studies indicative targets for retail floor space provision are as follows:

Convenience floor space capacity

2019

2024

2029

2033

Aylesbury town centre[21]

-

2,970

5,260 m2

6,980m2

Buckingham

-

-

-

-

Haddenham

-

-

-

-

Wendover

-

8 m2

20 m2

29 m2

Winslow

222 m2

262 m2

299 m2

328 m2

Comparison floor space Capacity

2019

2024

2029

2033

Aylesbury Vale total

5,966 m2

14,364 m2

22,587 m2

29,289 m2

No Comments 4.188 Aylesbury Town Centre Retail Capacity Update (December 2016) reflects the most up-to-date information on the amount of retail growth that the district could accommodate over the Plan period. Floorspace requirements have increased reflecting additional expenditure available and hence capacity. The update recognises Aylesbury's enhanced role as a potential new Garden Town delivering the majority of the district's growth.   Policies and allocations in this Plan provide for future retail provision to come forward over the Plan period. Further retail provision is also expected to come forward through neighbourhood plans.[22]

No Comments 4.189 The policy below suggests the amount of comparison and convenience retail provision that might be provided over the Plan period. The relative balance between comparison and convenience floorspace is indicative only and there may be scope for flexibility on this.

View Comments (1) 4.190 For convenience retail, the Plan allocates sufficient sites to meet nearly all the expected requirement in Aylesbury for the whole plan period (6,893sqm  out of 6,980sqm).   At Winslow, the Council will explore whether there is scope for including new retail as part of the development of a new station.  At Wendover, the amount of additional retail capacity is too small (29sqm) to make specific provision for.  For comparison retail, Local Plan site allocations have the potential to meet requirements up until 2028 (21,604 sqm out of 29,289 sqm).  Provision at Buckingham through the neighbourhood plan, should this come forward, will contribute towards the district wide requirement.   In the longer term, a potential further extension of Waterside North to include Hale Leys Shopping Centre may offer scope to develop additional retail floorspace.

View Comments (4) D6 Town, village and local centres to support new and existing communities

The strategy for town, village and local centres builds on the vision and strategic objectives set out in the VALP. Growth and expansion of town and local centres should be consistent with the existing hierarchy of centres within the district.

The Council will promote the sustainable growth and regeneration of Aylesbury, Buckingham, Haddenham, Wendover and Winslow. Within defined town centres, development proposals for retail, leisure, commercial, office, tourism, cultural, community and residential development will be supported (subject to compliance with other policies in the VALP) where they:

  1. retain or enhance the town centre's historic character and appearance, vitality and viability
  2. sustain or enhance diverse town centre uses and customer choice, incorporating residential accommodation above ground floor level where possible, and
  3. are readily accessible by public transport, walking and cycling.

Proposals for town centre uses should be sited within the town or local centres. Proposals for such uses outside town or local centres are to be considered against Policy E5.

Proposals for development in and around town, local or village centres, including proposals for changes of use, should support the aspirations for regeneration of those  centres including those subject to neighbourhood plans by improving the range and quality of retail, public realm, leisure, employment and training opportunities.

New local centres will be provided within major development areas.

In local and village centres, proposals for services and local community facilities will be supported, which are of an appropriate scale and do not compromise the character of the area and the functionality of the centre. These should ensure that any change of use from A1 maintains the general vitality and viability of the centre and does not seriously diminish the provision of local shopping facilities.

Local and village centres will be encouraged to grow and loss of essential facilities and businesses such as local shops, pubs and post offices will not be supported.

Retail Allocations

Comparison

Sq m

Convenience

Sq m

Woodlands, College Rd: A1: 2,000 sqm (assume 40% comparison) and A5: 1,000 sqm   See Policy AGT3

800

1,200

Berryfields MDA A1: 1,400sqm   (assume 35% comparison) See Policy  AGT5

490

910

Hampden Fields (See Policy AGT4):  around

1,200 sqm (GFA) Foodstore (Class A1), 900sqm (other local shops) - A1
600sqm restaurants and cafes - A3
600sqm Public House/Letting Rooms - A4
400sqm Professional Services - A2

1,050

1,050

Aston Clinton Road MDA A1/A2/A3 500sqm   (35% comparison)

70

130

Town Centre Redevelopment Area



Civic Quarter A1: 97sqm,

34

63

Royal Mail Sorting Office (100% comparison)

5,000

0

Waterside North Phase 2 and 3;  220,000sqft  (20,439 sqm) of which 30,000 sqft (2,790 sqm) A3/4/5. 17,700 sqm  A1 (80% comparison)

14,160

3,540

Total Floorspace (sqm)

21,604

6,893

Aylesbury town centre

View Comments (1) 4.191 Aylesbury is the county town of Buckinghamshire and has long been the focus of new development in the district and will continue to be the main location for growth in its role as a Garden Town.  Investment and development both inside and beyond the town centre boundary will be necessary to meet the needs of the growing population of the Garden Town.  Part of the vision for Aylesbury Garden Town is that by 2033, Aylesbury will have a thriving and revitalised town centre.  It will have an enhanced environment, with shops, leisure facilities, open space, homes, businesses and services, built and designed to high standards, bringing renewal to the town and enhancing the attraction of the historic core. 

View Comments (1) 4.192 Aylesbury is fortunate in having successfully retained its historic centre whilst accommodating significant modern developments. A major part of its attraction is the proximity of the "Old Town", centred around St. Mary's Church, to the main shopping area. Within the shopping area a number of historic buildings and frontages add to its distinctiveness and character.

View Comments (1) 4.193 Recent years have seen significant local authority investment in the town with the development of Aylesbury Waterside Theatre, Waitrose, Travelodge, a university campus and new parking. Further regeneration is planned as part of The Exchange scheme. The town is reasonably well represented by national retailers and has a major department store. The owners of the two shopping centres continue to invest in improving the interior environment and Friars Square, the larger centre has been particularly successful in attracting new brands and strengthening the town's fashion offer. However, in order to compete successfully within the sub-region, Aylesbury needs to overcome the current challenges it faces.

The challenges

No Comments 4.194 Increase in economic and political uncertainty – Nationally consumers have proved remarkably resilient since the Brexit vote and, despite the unprecedented backdrop, consumer spending has generally remained robust. However, with the prospect of rising inflation, the increasing reliance on consumer debt to support spending, and the lack of detail about the impact of Brexit, there is concern  about consumer confidence and how this will affect spending patterns. 

The outlook for retailers is also challenging. With rising costs, but consumer confidence uncertain, retailers are having to consider how much they can pass on to consumers. Retailers are likely to hold back on capital expenditure and employment particularly in towns of Aylesbury's size which are still working to establish themselves as a destination in their own right.  This inevitably means that  future aspirations for the town centre need to recognise that phased development within a vision framework will be the favoured approach.

No Comments 4.195 Attractiveness and identity – like all town centres, there are areas of Aylesbury which haven't been improved for some time and consequently reflect negatively on the town. This affects both visitors' perception and those of potential new investors. The Aylesbury Town Centre Plan makes clear that future plans need to pay equal attention to these areas as well as the opportunities for new development.

View Comments (1) 4.196 A growing population – with Aylesbury  remaining the main focus and a significant area for housing and employment growth in the district, further infrastructure  including outer link roads to help reduce town centre congestion, as well as retail within and beyond the town centre, will need to continue to develop, simply to meet the needs of a growing and working population. However, timescales for new infrastructure  can be long and Aylesbury will need to work hard to retain its consumer base.

No Comments 4.197 Protecting existing investment – the success of existing assets and investments, whether private or public, depend on the whole visitor experience. Plans to deliver new shops, catering outlets and public realm improvements to support, for example, Aylesbury Waterside Theatre, have not come forward as quickly as originally anticipated, largely due to the economic downturn and developers holding back on capital expenditure.

No Comments 4.198 Competition and changing expectations – as well as people's changing expectations of their town centres, other growing trends are posing a threat to the traditional high street:

No Comments 4.199 Out of town retailing – key retailers moving out of Aylesbury's town centre when their  leases come up for renewal to capitalise on more modern units tailored to their requirements, and often cheaper rents and business rates, could have a major impact.  

No Comments 4.200 Competition from major supermarkets – that have made themselves more appealing to  people with busy lifestyles by broadening  their non-food retail offer and raising their game in sectors such as fashion by using leading designers.

No Comments 4.201 Omnichannel shopping – this continues to be the single biggest impact on the shape of town centre retailing. The speed at which retailing has shifted online is putting strain on traditional business models, many of which are no longer fit for purpose. Many retailers are responding by rationalising their portfolio but also by developing a seamless omnichannel offer which includes a convenient click and collect offer for the consumer, and an opportunity for the retailer to capture secondary purchases through the collect visit.   

No Comments 4.202 Consumers making fewer, shorter trips to towns – preferring to make longer trips, less frequently, to bigger regional centres which offer the total day experience. Here shopping can be combined with a variety of leisure activities, whether dining or visiting the cinema.  A two-hour drive is not considered unreasonable by today's consumers. The exception to this is food shopping, where the main shop trip size is getting smaller and the top-up trip size is getting bigger. This change is a result of the competition and people wanting to shop around from the big four supermarkets and the increase in the number of small convenience stores. 

No Comments 4.203 Leisure time is becoming more important – to people leading busy lives and as people make use of digital technology to make their purchases. This has resulted in a notable shift in consumerism towards the pursuit of experience over material goods. Shopping will no longer be the primary reason to visit a town centre. The opportunity to socialise in Aylesbury town centre will be key to its future success.

No Comments 4.204 The proposed East-West Rail route – could attract visitors from the villages in between   Aylesbury and Milton Keynes. However, it will also make it easier and more attractive for them to go to MK from Winslow (a new station is due to open in the early 2020s) if Aylesbury does not succeed in improving its offer.

No Comments 4.205 The rising popularity and enhancement – of other competing centres such as High Wycombe and Bicester town.

Failure to capitalise on our catchment

No Comments 4.206 Aylesbury has a large potential catchment of 259,000 people within a 25 minute drive time[23]. Three-quarters of this catchment – well above the national average have a high quality lifestyle profile and  are in the top three Acorn groups - affluent achievers, rising prosperity, and comfortable communities.  The majority of Aylesbury's catchment are consumers with good levels of disposable income seeking good quality products and good quality shopping/leisure experiences.  It's also a high spending catchment over-indexing vs GB average on almost all categories. Yet the town is failing to capitalise fully on its catchment profile because, while some are visiting the town centre for employment reasons or to use services such as banks, they are not necessarily visiting in the numbers that could be achieved in terms of retail and other activities. Of those who are visiting, an insufficient number are spending their money in the town. So, unless Aylesbury improves its offer to give its catchment market what it is increasingly looking for, current leakage to neighbouring towns will continue.

Guiding principles and strategic aims for future development

View Comments (1) 4.207 In seeking to enhance Aylesbury's role as county town and sub-regional shopping centre, the Council has developed and approved the Aylesbury Town Centre Plan (2014) which was prepared working closely with Aylesbury Town Council, Buckinghamshire County Council and other key stakeholders ranging from local community organisations to owners of the shopping centres and independent operators.  The Town Centre Plan sets out seven guiding principles for the future development of Aylesbury town centre:

Principle 1: Positioning the town centre correctly by providing a complementary, credible experience to nearby centres such as Milton Keynes and Watford and being a 'best in class' sub-regional centre.

Principle 2: Being different, rather than a clone, but basing the town's unique selling point on reality. Aylesbury needs to distinguish itself from other town centres in the area, but in a way that is credible.

Principle 3: Offering what the 'market' is looking for to capitalise on our enviable  catchment. Whilst there has been significant investment in the town centre in recent years by both the public and private sector, Aylesbury's retail offer is currently weighted towards the lower/mass market consumer, with a limited choice in terms of product categories, ranges and brands for the mid/upper market, discerning consumer.

When asked what would make people visit Aylesbury Town Centre more often, 'better quality shops' was the most common answer, followed by 'more independents, better department stores and more high street brands'[24].  An independent food and beverage assessment carried out by Coverpoint in 2014 also concludes that the town centre food and beverage sector needs more choice across all categories, but particularly in the family dining and mid-higher quality categories. This research was used to inform phase one of The Exchange scheme. However, with the continued  growth in the food and beverage market, coupled with the housing growth planned for the Aylesbury area and the development of a residential community in the heart of the town itself,  there is still significant unmet demand.  

Principle 4: Encouraging social interaction. Whilst the retail experience is changing largely as a result of omnichannel retailing, visitors will still value a physical town centre outlet, particularly if it offers them opportunities to browse and spend time in an attractive environment and meet their friends and family. They will see the town centre as a place not just for shopping or business, but for social interaction in its widest sense and as a place in which to meet, relax and spend their leisure time.  New improvement schemes need to recognise this by delivering, integrated mixed uses including housing and quality public space throughout the town to help connect the different areas.

Principle 5: Build community spirit. Social interaction is about inclusiveness and using space and facilities to help build a sense of togetherness as one community. We should aim to create a town which shows its community spirit through welcoming events and activities.  

Principle 6: Take a connected, 'whole town' approach. The success of one area of the town should not be compromised by development in another and we must take a strategic approach to work such as green infrastructure and signage.

Principle 7: Appeal to all our different town centre users. We must make sure we're appealing to the whole of our potential catchment including families, young professionals, students, college and university leavers who are looking for their first jobs, empty nesters and older people.

No Comments 4.208 The following strategic aims flow from the guiding principles, our vision for Aylesbury and the studies and strategies which arose from the recommendations from the previous Aylesbury Town Centre Masterplan work carried out by ARUP. They are cross-cutting, which means they have implications for the whole of the town, but the action plans in the Town Centre Plan show how they will apply to specific areas.

View Comments (1) 4.209 The strategic aims are grouped under two main headings, economic regeneration and physical regeneration:

Economic regeneration

No Comments 4.210 Provide a more balanced and attractive leisure, retail and food and beverage offer and circuit, which:

Physical regeneration

No Comments 4.211 Create a high quality, connected and sustainable built, natural and transport environment which appeals to, and matches the needs of, all consumers and business investors within our catchment market and supports our leisure, retail and housing aspirations.

The vision

No Comments 4.212 To enable Aylesbury to compete and succeed in the future we need to continue our work to reinvigorate the town centre.  The Aylesbury Town Centre Plan contains the following vision for the town:

(Aylesbury Town Centre Plan, 2014)

No Comments 4.213 There are a number of uses and activities that should be accommodated in the town centre including shopping, leisure, entertainment, employment, housing, worship and tourism. It is an objective of this Plan to accommodate these sometimes competing uses in a way which most benefits the whole of the town centre.

No Comments 4.214 The Aylesbury Town Centre Plan reflects the advice in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) regarding town centres, which states that policies should support their viability and vitality and promote competitive town centres that provide customer choice and a diverse retail offer.

View Comments (1) 4.215 Action plans for areas in the Town Centre Plan are summarised below:

Area

Action Plan main aim

How VALP will help achieve

Market Square, Walton Street and Friars Square

Make more of the area's presence as a key retail, catering and leisure hub

Town centre policies to support proposals for retail and other main town centre uses, provided they are in accordance with the vision and aims for the town centre

Kingsbury (including George Street and Pebble Lane)

Create a more attractive environment for residents, visitors and businesses and improve it as the gateway to the Old Town

Town centre policies to support public realm improvements and improving the quality of the town centre

Aylesbury Old Town (the historic quarter)

Preserve and enhance this residential area as a key part of the town's heritage and culture offer and improve its links with the rest of the town centre, in keeping with its conservation area status

Heritage assets policy to ensure these are properly considered when assessing development proposals

Gateway South (railway and bus stations)

Improve the railway and bus stations as key arrival points and improve their connection with the rest of the town centre

Allocation of area for comprehensive redevelopment (as shown on the policies map) including co-locating the bus and railway stations to create a public transport interchange

Upper and middle High street

Create a more attractive retail environment (especially in middle High Street), improve connections between upper High Street and Exchange Street, ensure both upper and middle High Street are part of the retail circuit and flow with the rest of the town centre

Town centre policies to support public realm improvements and improving the quality of the town centre, including improvements for pedestrian access

Cambridge Street, Buckingham Street and New Street

Cambridge Street:

Improve the quality and attractiveness of the whole area, the continuity of active frontages along Cambridge Street and the appeal of Cambridge Street to independent shops.

Buckingham Street and New Street:

Improve the physical environment, reduce dominance of the car and integrate the area more fully into the rest of the town centre and the retail circuit

Town centre policies to support proposals for retail,  public realm improvements and improving the quality of the town centre, including improvements for pedestrian access

Vale Park and the Grand Union canal (to Circus Fields)

Capitalise on two of the town's key assets and connect them with the rest of the town centre and the wider countryside.

One of the key elements of the Aylesbury Garden Town vision is that the town will have an accessible, sustainable and well managed green infrastructure network including improved linkages from the town to new communities and to the surrounding countryside

Waterside South (from Walton Street junction to Upper Hundreds including Exchange Street and lower High Street)

Break down the concrete barrier of the inner ring road and improve links and accessibility from the rest of the town centre to Aylesbury Waterside Theatre, Aqua Vale Leisure Centre, Vale Park and the retail parks

Part of the site has already been redeveloped.  The plan allocates an increased area for mixed-use redevelopment on a site between the Exchange Street car park and the Royal Mail sorting office

Waterside North

Develop the site in phases to enhance the retail, food and beverage and housing offer in the town centre, strengthen links and help rejuvenate neighbouring areas such as Market Square, Walton Street and middle High Street

Development underway.  General policies to support appropriate development in the town centre

A place to shop

View Comments (1) 4.216 In accordance with the NPPF, the principles of the settlement hierarchy, and recognising Aylesbury's role as a Garden Town, new shopping development should be concentrated at Aylesbury, and this development should be concentrated within or at the edge of the town centre.  Aylesbury's town centre embraces a multitude of uses and activities including shops, homes, jobs, pubs and clubs, restaurants, leisure, sports and community facilities.  The town centre is defined on the Policies Map and includes the area within the inner relief road, along with areas to the south which include Morrison's and the railway station, to the south-east including Aylesbury Waterside Theatre, Waitrose, and Vale Park and Aqua Vale Swimming and Fitness Centre to the east, and to the north-east including Aylesbury Shopping Park, B&Q and the Royal Mail sorting office. The town centre boundary is as identified in the Aylesbury Vale Retail Study 2015 Annex F and is shown on the Policies Map.  Proposals for development within this area will be considered having regard to their town centre location.

New floor space requirements

Comparison goods

No Comments 4.217 As the population grows with the expansion of the town and within the wider district, there is a need for the town's shopping facilities to expand and improve in order to maintain Aylesbury's role as the main retail focus in Aylesbury Vale and as a sub-regional centre in the county.  The Aylesbury Town Centre Retail Capacity Update was carried out in 2016. This concludes that 22,587sqm of comparison floor space[25]will be required by 2024, increasing to 29,289sqm by 2033.

No Comments 4.218 New comparison retailing will be focused at Aylesbury as the main focus for shopping in the district, recognising its role as a Garden Town. This figure is not seen as a prescriptive target, but rather as an indicative guide to the amount of floor space that will be required in the Plan period.   

No Comments 4.219 It is essential to locate comparison shopping in such a way as to extend range and choice. The first priority is therefore to accommodate the additional floor space within the retail core of the town centre. The additional floor space will primarily be delivered by allocating a new site within the town centre for a mixed-use redevelopment.

View Comments (1) 4.220 Waterside North, a town centre site adjacent to Exchange Street, has been identified for a number of years as the location for the next phases of development and is currently under construction.  The Phase one scheme will see the construction on part of the site, of up to four restaurants, with 47 apartments on three floors above and a new public square. It is due to be completed in 2018.

No Comments 4.221 The provision of the additional retail floor space is expected to be included in future phases of development which  will extend the site beyond Waterside North to the Royal Mail sorting office.  This area is shown on the policies map. In addition to retail, these development phases should provide a mix of main town centre uses (and an element of residential) and fulfil the vision and strategic aims for the town centre as set out above.  This should include an element of car parking to redress any shortfall from the loss of existing car parks as a result the next phase of town centre regeneration.

No Comments 4.222 An Aylesbury parking strategy, due to be commissioned shortly, will set out the Council's aims regarding parking in the town, identify the amount the town centre needs and conclude where this should be located and in what form. 

No Comments 4.223 Within the town centre, the Council will view positively proposals for retail and other main town centre uses provided they contribute positively to improving the quality of the town centre and delivering the vision and aims set out above. The 2015 Retail Study concludes that qualitative improvements and investment will be needed to retain Aylesbury's credibility as a sub-regional centre and ensure that it can increasingly be seen as a place for social interaction.  In particular, the development or redevelopment of smaller sites can lead to qualitative improvements in shopping facilities and can readily be accommodated within and enhance the town centre.  Other proposals for town centre comparison goods shopping will be assessed against policy D6.

Convenience stores

No Comments 4.224 Aylesbury is well served by convenience stores[26], and the Retail Capacity Study Update 2016 concludes that convenience floorspace capacity in the short term (up to and beyond 2019) is sufficient to accommodate the known pipeline commitments plus some headroom.  By 2024 the capacity floorspace moves to 2,970sqmrising to 5,260sqm by 2029 and 6,980sqmby 2033. Within the town centre, a scheme for external enhancements and an extension to the existing Sainsbury's store fronting Buckingham Street has been approved subject to a Section 106 planning obligation agreement.  This is linked to the development of the larger, new Sainsbury's store which is proposed at Gatehouse Road, Aylesbury.  

Aylesbury transport hub

No Comments 4.225 As part of the overall vision for the town and to ensure that the town remains accessible, an area known as the Aylesbury transport hub is allocated for comprehensive mixed use redevelopment, including co-locating the bus and railway stations to create a new public transport interchange.  New residential units will be provided, along with public realm improvements, connectivity improvements to the rest of the town, new open space and other main town centre uses including a hotel.

View Comments (5) D7 Town centre redevelopment

The starting point for identifying sites in the town centre is the Aylesbury Town Centre Plan (2014). The Policies Map identifies a site between the Exchange Street car park and the Royal Mail sorting office (including Hampden House and Upper Hundreds car park) for mixed-use redevelopment based principally on retail uses with an element of residential and other town centre uses at an appropriate scale and location.  The redevelopment scheme(s) must make adequate provision for car parking in accordance with the Council's car parking strategy.  Development proposals must contribute positively to meeting the vision and strategic aims for the town centre.  Details of retail floorspace provision are set out in Policy D6.

Aylesbury town centre and the primary shopping frontages are defined on the Policies Map (see Policy E2).  Informed by the aims and objectives of the Aylesbury Town Centre Plan, and the evidence in the retail studies identifying a continuing need to improve and invest in Aylesbury town centre, qualitative redevelopment in the town centre will be supported and encouraged. 

The policies map also identifies an area for the Aylesbury transport hub.  This area is allocated for comprehensive mixed use redevelopment including co-locating the bus and railway stations to create a new public transport interchange, provision of new residential units, public realm improvements, connectivity improvements to the rest of the town, new open space and other main town centre uses including a new hotel and the relocation of the superstore. Friarage Road may need to be rerouted to accommodate the new development.

View Comments (3) D8 Aylesbury town centre

Elsewhere in the town centre, proposals for retail and other main town centre uses will be supported to reflect Aylesbury's status as Garden Town and the opportunities this will bring.  Proposals should contribute positively to improving the quality of the town centre and delivering the vision and strategic aims for the town centre set out above and in accordance with the latest published town centre plan.  Proposals should have particular regard to enhancements to the built environment, improvements for pedestrian access  and environmental enhancements to the public realm.

A place to live

No Comments 4.226 Residential uses in Aylesbury town centre are mainly concentrated in the 'Old Town' area around St. Mary's Church, extending along Church Street and Parsons Fee to Castle Street and Rickfords Hill and north from the church along Nelson Terrace, Granville Street and Ripon Street, and to the south-west of the town in the Friarscroft area.

View Comments (1) 4.227 It is important to ensure that the residential role of the town centre is not lost to ensure that Aylesbury continues and enhances its role as a vibrant and thriving town providing opportunities for social interaction. Providing more housing within and close to the town centre will help meet this aim. More housing in the town centre is sustainable; it will provide greater choice, a better balance of uses, accommodation for those who wish to be less reliant on the car, and increased activity outside peak periods. It will help provide a more attractive and safer town centre environment and add positively to the quality of the centre's urban fabric. A number of sites within Aylesbury town centre are identified as being suitable or part-suitable for housing development in the Housing and Economic Development Land Availability Assessment, and three of these are to be allocated for housing.  These sites are identified on the Policies Map.  Two further sites in the town centre are identified as part-suitable for housing (Royal Mail sorting office and Hampden House).These form part of the site for town centre redevelopment identified above and are covered by policy D7.

No Comments 4.228 Due to the change in permitted development rights, the Council has seen an increase in the number of offices that have been converted to flats.  It is anticipated that the recent increase in residential development in Aylesbury town centre will continue, not only by the conversion of employment to residential, but also the use of the upper floors above shops, which can be particularly suitable for conversion to flats.

View Comments (1) D9 Housing in Aylesbury town centre

The Council will support proposals for residential development in Aylesbury town centre that are consistent with the above vision and aims, in the following locations:

  1. use of upper floors above shops
  2. conversion of vacant or underused employment buildings
  3. as subsidiary parts of (re)development and other mixed use developments provided that this is of an appropriate scale and is in accordance with other policies in this Plan

A place of leisure and entertainment

View Comments (2) 4.229 Aylesbury town centre (which includes Vale Park, the canal basin and Aqua Vale Swimming and Fitness Centre) provides the focus for much of the town's leisure needs, and also serves a much wider catchment.  The town centre also provides entertainment facilities such as the Waterside Theatre, a cinema complex, parks, restaurants, bars and nightclubs. The Council recognises the essential role of such facilities in the town centre and will resist proposals that would result in the erosion of community facilities and services as set out in policy I3.

Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople sites

View Comments (1) 4.230 This policy sets out a criteria-based approach to assess potential allocations and any applications for new sites or for expanding current sites within the district. This is required to ensure that Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople accommodation is provided in suitable locations. It is important to identify sites that are sustainable economically, socially and environmentally; have access to services, facilities and potential sources of employment; and which will promote inclusive communities but which will not be out of scale with or dominate nearby settled communities. When considering whether a proposed Gypsy and Traveller site would dominate settled communities, regard will be given to existing Gypsy and Traveller sites outside the district boundary but still in close proximity to the settled community. As set out in the national planning guidance there is no presumption that a temporary grant of planning permission should be made permanent.

View Comments (1) 4.231 Good practice guidance[27] has previously advised that an average family pitch must be capable of accommodating an amenity building, a static and touring caravan, drying space for clothes, a lockable shed, parking space for two vehicles and a small garden.

View Comments (1) 4.232 The Government's Planning Policy for Traveller Sites (PPTS) identifies a definition distinction that Gypsies and Travellers who no longer lead a nomadic lifestyle are treated as non-travelling Gypsies and Travellers for the purposes of the planning system and their needs must therefore be met by the requirements of the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF). However the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Equalities Act 2010 protects their cultural choice to live in mobile accommodation and therefore there is a need to plan for this type of accommodation within the Plan.

View Comments (5) D10 Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople sites

Proposals for Gypsy, Traveller and Travelling Showpeople sites or Gypsy and Traveller park home sites will be supported where it can be demonstrated that there is an identified need, taking into account existing local provision and the availability of alternative sites, and the following criteria have been met:

  1. It has reasonable access to existing local services and facilities (including shops, schools, healthcare and public transport). Sites should either be within or close to existing sustainable settlements or with good access to classified roads and/or public transport
  2. Have safe and convenient vehicular access without giving rise to adverse impacts on highway safety
  3. Be able to achieve a reasonable level of visual and acoustic privacy for both people living on the site and those living nearby
  4. Not have a significantly adverse impact on environmental assets such as the countryside, landscapes, the historic environment, biodiversity, watercourses (including an ecological buffer zone), open space and green infrastructure
  5. The size and scale of the site and the number of caravans stationed is appropriate to the size and density of the local settled community, and does not dominate the nearest settled community
  6. The site should not be located where there is a risk of flooding or be affected by environmental hazards that may affect residents' health or welfare
  7. The site must be capable of being adequately serviced by drinking water, utilities and sewerage disposal facilities 
  8. Sites should remain small in scale – no more normally than 15 pitches on any one site
  9. Sites should be suitably designed and the layout include enough space to accommodate the proposed number of caravans, landscaping, vehicles and ancillary work areas as appropriate.

In the case of Travelling Showpeople, proposals will be also be assessed, taking into account the needs for mixed use yards and the nature and scale of the Showpeople's business in terms of land required for storage and/or the exercising of animals. 

Sites in the Green Belt will not be permitted unless other locations have been considered and only then where very special circumstances can be demonstrated.

[12] Buckinghamshire County Council, Buckinghamshire Thames Valley LEP, South East Midlands LEP and Buckinghamshire Advantage.

[13] These include completions and commitments for Stoke Mandeville, Bierton and Weston Turville as these settlements do not have their own housing allocations due to their proximity to Aylesbury and are included within the Aylesbury figures (inline with Policies S2 and S3).

[15] Outline consent approved subject to S106 (15/03806/AOP)

[16] Outline consent granted 05 Dec 2013 (13/06249/AOP)

[17] Outline consent granted 14 Oct 2008 (07/00052/ADP)

[18] Application awaiting decision 16/00424/AOP

[19] Application awaiting decision 16/01040/AOP

[20] resolution to approve outline application 15/00314/AOP

[21] This takes account of the pipeline/commitment at Gatehouse Quarter of 2,806sqm. If this development does not come forward there may be a requirement for the equivalent floorspace to come forward earlier in the Plan period.

[22] For example, Buckingham Neighbourhood Development Plan Policy (October 2015) EE2 allocates  land for retail, office and mixed development. Winslow Neighbourhood Plan Policy 18 allocates land for a new food retail store of up to 300 sqm, Steeple Claydon NP Policy SC2  allocates a site (280sqm) for A1 convenience food retail.

[23] Aylesbury Town Centre Retail Capacity Update, December 2016

[24] Postcode Plus Survey.  July 2016

[25] Comparison goods are defined in full in the glossary, but include items such as clothing and electrical items

[26] Convenience stores are defined in full in the glossary but include items such as food, beverages and newspapers

[27] Designing Gypsy and Traveller Sites – Good Practice Guide, CLG, 2008; revoked 2015

Previous Chapter || Next Chapter
Having trouble using the system? Visit our help page or contact us directly.

Powered by OpusConsult